Detailed Facility Report Data Dictionary

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This data dictionary describes the data elements that are presented in the Detailed Facility Report.

The Detailed Facility Report is organized into six primary sections:


Important Notes

Consider the following as you analyze the data:

  • The Detailed Facility Report is an aggregate report; therefore, some data are displayed differently due to differences in tracking methods and indicators used in the source databases.

  • Each facility may not have data for every report section. If no relevant data exist for a given report section, a note is displayed explaining no information exists for this facility.

  • Compliance and enforcement data are separate from other environmental information that is included to provide context for analyses (e.g., chemical release and demographic data).

  • The age of the data presented varies and is dependent on when data were last updated from the source database. The dates of the last updates made in ECHO are shown in the Data Sources section of About the Data.

  • Date ranges referenced in the Detailed Facility Report are defined as follows:
    • Quarter – Any of the following three-month periods: January-March, April-June, July-September, or October-December.
    • Last Three Years – The twelve most recently completed quarters, plus data from the current quarter up until the refresh date.
    • Last Five Years – The twenty most recently completed quarters, plus data from the current quarter up until the refresh date.

  • Violation, non-compliance, significant non-compliance, and high priority violation are all terms used by the ECHO website to describe the facility’s status in regard to compliance with the law. In many cases, these terms reflect determinations made by EPA or states when conducting inspections or reviewing facility self-reports. These determinations assist the government in tracking resolution of violations through the enforcement process and do not necessarily represent a final adjudication by a judicial or administrative body. In such cases, these characterizations should be considered alleged violations. Additional information on how to interpret a facility’s compliance status is available on ECHO’s Frequently Asked Questions page.

  • The duration of violations shown on this report is an estimate of the actual duration of the violations that might be alleged or later determined in a legal proceeding. For example, the start date of the violation as shown in the ECHO database is normally when the government first became aware of the violation, not the first date that the violation occurred, and the facility may have corrected the violation before the end date shown. In some situations, violations may have been corrected by the facility, but EPA or the State has not verified the correction of these violations. In other situations, EPA does not remove the violation flag until an enforcement action has been resolved.

  • ECHO includes data from the following national program databases:
    • Facility Registry Service (FRS)
    • ICIS-Air - ECHO is displaying Clean Air Act data from the modernized national data management system, ICIS-Air. Some states are still establishing data transfer connections to ICIS-Air. Data for these states were migrated from the retired system, are frozen, and reflect data as of October 17, 2014. For more information on the transition to ICIS-Air, see How New National Air Data System Affects ECHO Data Display.
    • Integrated Compliance Information System (ICIS) Federal Enforcement and Compliance (FE&C) for the following environmental laws:
      • Clean Air Act (CAA)
      • Clean Water Act (CWA)
      • Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA)
      • Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA)
      • Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA)
      • Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA)
      • Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act (FIFRA)
      • Marine Protection, Research, and Sanctuaries Act (MPRSA)
      • Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA)
    • ICIS National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (ICIS-NPDES)
    • Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Information (RCRAInfo) System
    • Safe Drinking Water Information System (SDWIS)
    • Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) Data
    • Emission Inventory System (EIS) Database

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Facility Summary

This section presents a general, high-level summary of the selected facility, including a map of the facility location, basic facility identification information, regulatory interests (e.g., facility permits and other program identifiers), and a snap-shot of the facility's current enforcement and compliance record.

Map
Location of the facility based on latitude/longitude coordinates displayed on a map. Other nearby facilities also will display. Only those facilities with available geographical data are mapped. The symbols used are described in detail below:

Stripe color corresponds to the statute under which the facility is regulated.
Multimedia marker Multimedia (multiple statutes)
RCRA marker Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA)
CWA marker Clean Water Act (CWA)
SDWA marker Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA)
CAA marker Clean Air Act (CAA)
CAA marker None of the above (Facility Registry Service (FRS)-only facility)

Body color corresponds to compliance status of the facility.
Serious noncompliance marker Facility is in serious noncompliance
Compliance marker Facility has no violations in database
Noncompliance marker Facility is in noncompliance
Compliance information unavailable marker Facility whose compliance information is unavailable

Icon numbering corresponds to the number of years since the facility was last inspected.
1 years since inspection marker2 years since inspection marker3 years since inspection marker4 years since inspection marker5 years since inspection marker
Longer than 5 years since inspection marker Longer than 5 years
Never inspected marker Never inspected

Icon size differentiates between major and minor facilities.
Minor facility marker Minor facility
Major facility marker Major facility

Facility Information
Facility Information included in this section is associated with a particular FRS ID. FRS links together all regulatory program database records (such as permit IDs and facility IDs that facilities use in reporting to EPA).
 
Facility Name
Company or permit holder name, as maintained in FRS. The facility name may differ across EPA databases due to differences in reported information, change in ownership, use of parent or subsidiary name, etc.
Facility Address
Street address, city, state, and zip code where facility is located, as maintained in FRS. Certain data systems also maintain mailing address information, which is not used in this report. The street address may differ across EPA databases due to differences in reported information (e.g., use of mailing address), change in ownership, use of parent or subsidiary address, etc.
FRS ID
The identification number that is assigned to a facility by FRS to uniquely identify a facility site.
EPA Region
The EPA region where the facility is located. EPA has 10 regional offices that execute programs within several states and territories.
Latitude/Longitude
The facility or permit holder's latitude and longitude coordinates.
Locational Data Source
The source database of the facility's latitude and longitude location data.
Industry
The description of the first 3 digits of the 6-digit NAICS code associated with the facility. NAICS codes may differ between program data systems, so the NAICS description is chosen from one data system in the following preferential order: TRI, GHG, ICIS-Air, RCRA, ICP. If no NAICS code exists, the SIC code description is displayed. This field may be blank if there are no NAICS or SIC codes associated with the facility. See the Facility/System Characteristics section to view additional Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) codes and North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) codes associated with the facility.
Indian Country
A value of "N/A" (Not Available) indicates this information is not maintained in the program data system. "N" indicates the facility is not in Indian country, and a value of "Y" indicates the facility is in Indian country according to EPA's Facility Registry Service. Indian country is defined by statute at 18 U.S.C. 1151 and includes all lands within Indian reservations, dependent Indian communities, and allotted lands.

3-Year Compliance Status

A grid that illustrates a facility's quarterly compliance status for all applicable statutes. Note: "Unknown" indicates for facilities regulated under the Clean Water Act that EPA's data system is not able to determine the facility-level compliance status. For facilities regulated under other statutes, "Not Available" indicates that compliance status data are unavailable in EPA's data systems. See the Three Year Compliance Status by Quarter table for more detailed compliance information. 

Enforcement and Compliance Summary Table

Key Terms

Violation, non-compliance, significant non-compliance, and high priority violation are all terms used by the ECHO website to describe the facility’s status in regard to compliance with the law. In many cases, these terms reflect determinations made by EPA or states when conducting inspections or reviewing facility self-reports. These determinations assist the government in tracking resolution of violations through the enforcement process and do not necessarily represent a final adjudication by a judicial or administrative body. In such cases, these characterizations should be considered alleged violations. Additional information on how to interpret a facility’s compliance status is available on ECHO’s Frequently Asked Questions page.

Statute
Identifies the environmental statute associated with each of the permits and identifiers linked to the facility:
  • CAA — Clean Air Act
  • CWA — Clean Water Act
  • EPCRA — Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act, Section 313 (i.e., the Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) program)
  • FIFRA — Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act
  • RCRA — Resource Conservation and Recovery Act
  • SDWA — Safe Drinking Water Act
  • TSCA — Toxic Substances Control Act
Inspections (Insp) (5 years)
The number of inspections/compliance evaluations, under the corresponding statute, occurring at the facility within the last five years. This count only includes inspection types that are counted as inspections in official counts. See Compliance Monitoring History for a list of inspection types counted.
Date of Last Inspection
The date on which the most recent inspection of the facility took place. For the Clean Air Act, the date on which a Full Compliance Evaluation (FCE) was completed. This date may or may not correspond to an actual site visit. A series of partial on- or off-site inspections may have been conducted during the fiscal year as part of an FCE.
Compliance Status
Displays an indication of the most recent compliance status for each statute under which the facility is regulated. Status codes include:
  • No Violation – Blue
  • Noncompliance - Yellow-orange
  • Significant Violation – Red
  • No Information/Unknown/Not Available - Gray
Quarters in Non-Compliance (Qtrs in NC) (of 12)
Count of the number of quarters, out of the last twelve quarters, in which the permit or site is considered either with violations, in non-compliance (NC) status, or in Significant Non-compliance (SNC) or High Priority Violation (HPV) status. Additional information on how to interpret compliance status information can be found on ECHO's Frequently Asked Questions page. A quarter is any of the following 3-month calendar periods: January-March, April-June, July-September, or October-December.
Quarters (Qtrs) in Significant Violation
The number of quarters (of 12) in significant violation by statute. Additional information on how to interpret compliance status information can be found on ECHO's Frequently Asked Questions page.
Informal Enforcement Actions (5 years)
The number of informal enforcement actions taken against the facility, under the corresponding statute, within the last five years.
Formal Enforcement Actions (5 years)
The number of formal enforcement actions taken against the facility, under the corresponding statute, within the last five years. This count only includes enforcement actions that have been entered in the national program databases: ICIS-Air, ICIS-NPDES, and RCRAInfo. Federal CAA and RCRA enforcement actions that have been entered into ICIS are not included in this section to avoid duplicative counting. (Please note that all actions at NPDES facilities in states using ICIS-NPDES are counted.) Please refer to the Formal Enforcement Actions section to determine which actions qualify.
Penalties from Formal Enforcement Actions (5 years)
The total dollar amount of either assessed or final penalties resulting from formal enforcement actions. This count only includes penalties that have been entered in the national program databases: ICIS-Air, ICIS-NPDES, and RCRAInfo. Refer to the Formal Enforcement Actions table for more information.
EPA Cases
The number of EPA enforcement cases in ICIS FE&C. Refer to the ICIS Case History table for more information.
Penalties from EPA Cases (5 years)
The total dollar amount of either assessed (or final) penalties. This count only includes penalties that have been entered in the national program databases: ICIS-Air, ICIS-NPDES, and RCRAInfo. Federal CAA and RCRA penalties that have been entered into ICIS Federal Enforcement and Compliance are not included in this section to avoid duplicative counting. This count does not include proposed penalties in RCRAInfo or the cost of Supplemental Environmental Projects (SEPs).

Related Reports

If the facility has any related reports available in ECHO, the Related Reports section will appear below the Enforcement and Compliance Summary table with hyperlinks to all available reports, described below. If multiple reports are available for a particular report type, clicking on the report hyperlink will open an overlay window with hyperlinks to all available reports.

CWA Effluent Charts
Opens the facility's Effluent Charts page. The Effluent Charts page presents dynamic charts and tables of permitted effluent limits, releases, and violations over time for Clean Water Act (CWA) wastewater discharge permits issued under the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES).
CWA Pollutant Loading Report
Opens the facility's Discharge Monitoring Report (DMR) Pollutant Loading Tool Facility Information page. The Pollutant Loading Report displays information about the facility, NPDES program information, permit limits, calculated annual pollutant discharges, receiving water information, and wastewater treatment technology information.
Enforcement Case Report
The Enforcement Case Report presents information from EPA's Integrated Compliance Information System (ICIS). A Case Report summarizes federal administrative or judicial civil enforcement actions taken by the U.S. EPA, as well as state formal enforcement actions taken pursuant to delegated authority to implement the Clean Water Act National Pollution Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) program.
Facility Documents
Provides link(s) to documents such as permits, reports, notifications, or other information about facility compliance under CAA, CWA, and RCRA. The types of documents and date ranges available may differ between facilities.
Note: Document links are currently available only for programs administered by the New Hampshire Department of Environmental Services Exit, water programs administered by the Arkansas Department of Environmental Quality Exit, and individual NPDES permits administered by the Utah Department of Environmental Quality.  EPA plans to expand the facility document linkages to other states in the future.
Air Pollutant Report
Opens the Facility's Air Pollutant Report page. The Air Pollutant Report page presents information about air emissions from large stationary sources from four EPA air programs and presents facility-level emissions data for the previous ten years.
CWA Program Area Reports
Provides link(s) to EPA reports containing additional information pertaining to some Clean Water Act program areas. Currently, where applicable, ECHO provides access to Sanitary Sewer Overflow reports.
Regulatory Information
For each of the following four environmental laws, displays key identification information for the facility where applicable:
  • Clean Air Act: Facility activity and operating status (e.g., Operating Major)
     
  • Clean Water Act: Major/non-major status, permit status and hyperlinked Permit ID(s) to access additional details for each permit number through EPA's Envirofacts (e.g., Major, Permit Effective (DC0000019, DC0000018))
     
  • Safe Drinking Water ActOwner, water source type, system type, facility activity status, and SDWA ID  (e.g., OWNER: Private SOURCE: Ground water TYPE: Community water system, Permit Active (CA1000267))
     
  • Resource Conservation and Recovery Act: Facility activity status and type (e.g., Active Small Quantity Generator)
Other Regulatory Reports
Where applicable, displays information about related environmental emission reporting programs, including hyperlinks to other data system reports, including:
  • Air Emissions Inventory (EIS): The Emissions Inventory System contains information on stationary and mobile sources that emit criteria air pollutants and their precursors, as well as hazardous air pollutants (HAPs). The database includes estimates of emissions, by source, of air pollutants in each area of the country, on an annual basis.
     
  • Greenhouse Gas Emissions (eGGRT): Links to the facility report for the most recent available reporting year in EPA's Facility Level Information on Greenhouse Gases Tool (FLIGHT).
     
  • Toxic Releases (TRI): Links to the EPA Envirofacts Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) facility report.

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Facility/System Characteristics

This section provides additional detailed facility identification information that is tracked in EPA's Facility Registry Service (FRS), including: geographic location information, program-specific facility ID numbers, permit IDs and related status information, standard industrial classification code(s), etc.

Facility/System Characteristics Table

System
The data source associated with the additional facility information.
  • AIR - ICIS-Air
  • EIS - Emissions Inventory System
  • FRS - Facility Registry Service
  • GHG - Greenhouse Gas Emissions
  • ICP - ICIS National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (ICIS-NPDES)
  • RCR - Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Information (RCRAInfo)
  • RMP - Clean Air Act Risk Management Plan Program
  • SDWIS - Safe Drinking Water Information System
  • TRI - Toxics Release Inventory
  • TSCA - Toxic Substances Control Act
Statute
Identifies the environmental statute associated with each of the permits and identifiers linked to the facility. Only CAA, CWA, RCRA, and EP313 are displayed in this section. The first row of this table is typically FRS data, which are not associated with a particular statute.
  • CAA — Clean Air Act
  • CWA — Clean Water Act
  • RCRA — Resource Conservation and Recovery Act
  • SDWA — Safe Drinking Water Act
  • EP313 — Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act, Section 313 (i.e., the Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) program)
  • TSCA - Toxic Substances Control Act
  • RMP - Risk Management Plan Rule
  • CAMD - Clean Air Markets Division
Identifier
An alphanumeric field that displays the source database abbreviation and the unique value assigned for each record/permit/site within each data system. These identifiers are for tracking purposes in the individual data systems. The identifier used in the federal ICIS-Air database is typically different from the permit number issued to the facility.
Universe
This field provides further description on type of permit or record for each data system as follows:
For CAA - The plant-level classification of a source's emission status. ICIS-AIR generates a plant-level classification reflecting the highest emission level classification of criteria pollutants regulated by an Air program. Emission status may include: Major Emissions, Synthetic Minor Emissions, Minor Emissions, Classification Unknown, Other, or Not Applicable.

The program office defines each CAA Source ID and the associated permits as being Federally Reportable or Non-Federally Reportable. Under the CAA, federally reportable sources include majors, synthetic minors, NESHAP Part 61 minors, minors with an unresolved High Priority Violation (HPV), with recent enforcement actions, or included on a Compliance Monitoring Strategy plan. The Clean Air Act requires that delegated agencies and EPA track all federally reportable sources in the ICIS-Air database.

GHG "Direct Emitters" are facilities that combust fuels or otherwise put GHGs into the atmosphere directly from their facility. GHG "Suppliers" are those entities that supply certain fossil fuels or fluorinated gases into the economy which, when combusted, released or oxidized emit greenhouse gases into the atmosphere. Learn about the Greenhouse Gas Reporting Program (GHGRP).
For CWA - Each CWA Source ID or National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit is defined by the program office as a Major or non-major discharger. Unlike major permits, states are not required to enter monitoring data into the EPA national data system for most non-major permits. This field also indicates the permit type.
For RCRA - Indicates the type of hazardous waste activity at the facility, including Treatment, Storage and Disposal Facility (TSDFs), Large Quantity Generator (LQG), Small Quantity Generators (SQG), Conditionally-Exempt Small Quantity Generator (CESQG), and Transporters. Operating TSDFs are noted as such (other TSDFs are inactive but haven’t completed all regulatory requirements for closure).
For SDWA - Indicates the type of owner, water source, and system for each unique ID for systems and facilities regulated under the Safe Drinking Water Act, which are tracked in the Safe Drinking Water Information System (SDWIS) database.
Owner
Water system owner type (e.g., Public or Private)
Water Source Type
  • Surface water (SW) - All water naturally open to the atmosphere (rivers, lakes, reservoirs, streams, impoundments, seas, estuaries, etc.) and all springs, wells, or other collectors that are directly influenced by surface water.
  • Ground water (GW) - The supply of fresh water found beneath the Earth's surface, usually in aquifers, often used for supplying wells and springs.
  • Ground water under direct influence of surface water (GU) - Any water beneath the surface of the ground with:
    • significant occurrence of insects or other macroorganisms, algae, or large-diameter pathogens such as Giardia lamblia; or
    • significant and relatively rapid shifts in water characteristics such as turbidity, temperature, conductivity, or pH that closely correlate to climatological or surface water conditions. Direct influence must be determined for individual sources in accordance with criteria established by the State. The State determination of direct influence may be based on site-specific measurements of water quality and/or documentation of well construction characteristics and geology with field evaluation.
Each of the source water types shown above may be preceded by the word “Purchased”, indicating that some or all of the water has been purchased from another public water system (PWS).
System Type
  • Public water system (PWS) - A system for the provision to the public of piped water for human consumption, which has at least 15 service connections or regularly serves an average of at least 25 individuals at least 60 days out of the year.
  • Community water system (CWS) - A public water system that serves at least 15 service connections used by year-round residents or regularly serves at least 25 year-round residents.
  • Non-community water system (NCWS) - A public water system that is not a community water system.
    • Transient non-community water system (TNCWS) - A public water system that provides water in a place such as a gas station or campground where people do not remain for a long period of time. Specifically, a non-community water system that does not serve 25 of the same nonresident persons per day for more than six months per year.
    • Non-transient non-community water system (NTNCWS) - A public water system that regularly supplies water to at least 25 of the same people at least six months per year, but not year-round. Specifically, a non-community water system that regularly serves at least 25 of the same nonresident persons per day for more than six months per year. Some examples are schools, factories, office buildings, and hospitals which have their own water systems.
Read ECHO's Guide to Regulated Facilities for more information about the types of facilities tracked in EPA's data systems.
Status
The status assigned to the facility by each national program database, as applicable.
CAA program status codes represent the operational condition of the facility:
  • Operating
  • Planned Facility
  • Under Construction
  • Temporarily closed
  • Permanently closed
  • Seasonal
  • NESHAP Spraying
  • NESHAP Renovation
  • NESHAP Demolition
  • Landfill
GHG displays whether a facility with a Greenhouse Gas Reporting Program ID number is subject or no longer subject to reporting its greenhouse gas emissions. Learn about the Greenhouse Gas Reporting Program (GHGRP).
CWA designates a permitted facility as Active or Inactive. Under the CWA, all facilities discharging pollutants from a point source (e.g., a pipe) to surface waters must have a NPDES permit. For CWA, ICIS-NPDES designates a permit as Effective, Administratively Continued, Expired, Not Needed, Pending, Retired, or Terminated.
RCRA facilities ("sites") are designated as Active or Inactive. Active means a site has activities occurring that are regulated under the federal Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), Subtitle C, or an authorized state's hazardous waste management regulations/statutes; or a site which has not been determined to be inactive for such regulated activities.
Activity status definitions are intended only for the purposes of data management and providing the public with information about hazardous waste or other RCRA Subtitle C activities. Activity status is determined from the information most recently submitted by a site's representative or determined by EPA or state authority. The designation of a site as "active" or "inactive" and the subcategories below have no legal or regulatory significance.
When a site is shown as Active on the Detailed Facility Report, one to five characters in parentheses will indicate the activities that led to the Active designation. The following list provides a definition for each character that may be displayed:

H - Handler activities (activities found on the federal SI form or a state-equivalent form) (Corresponds to subcategory 1 below.)
P - Permitting activities (site has at least one unit that is "active" according to RCRAInfo Legal/Operating Status) (Corresponds to subcategory 2 below.)
A - Corrective Action activities (site is in the RCRAInfo Corrective Action Workload Universe) (Corresponds to subcategory 4 below.)
C - Converter (the site has at least one unit that is a converter according to RCRAInfo Legal/Operating Status) (Corresponds to subcategory 3 below.)
S - State-specific activities (site has state-defined activities in the RCRAInfo Permitting or Handler module which the state wants included in the activity status calculation) (Corresponds to subcategory 5 below.)
RCRA site activity status definitions and site activity status designations are described below.The overall activity status of a site is Active if the site has activities from any of the five subcategories below, otherwise the site is deemed Inactive.
RCRA Activity (Based on Most Recent RCRAInfo data)DescriptionCaveats
Site Identification (SI) ActivitiesRegulated activities reported in Section 10 on the federal RCRA Subtitle C Site Identification (SI) Form (or 8700-12) or state-equivalent form. Only current activities (as determined by the RCRAInfo universe calculations) are considered. If any of these activities are checked as present at a site, then the site is considered to have SI activities.Excludes TSD and "Other" Universal Waste ("Other" Universal Waste is considered a State-Specific Activity
Treatment, Storage, Disposal (TSD) activitiesActivities for which EPA may enforce federal RCRA TSDF regulations, permits, and orders or a state may enforce regulations, permits, and orders under its authorized hazardous waste management plan. A site is considered to have TSD activities if one or more of its TSD units have a current Legal/Operating status code combination indicating it is in the Regulated ("R") UniverseThis definition may be revised.
ConvertersConverters are former TSD units that "converted" to hazardous waste activities not requiring a permit, but have not been closed by the site as required by EPA or a state. A site is considered to have Converter status if one or more of its units have a current Legal/Operating status code combination indicating it is in the Converter ("V") UniverseThis definition may be revised.
Corrective Action (CA) activitiesCorrective Action activities for which a site is subject to enforceable RCRA obligations. The presence of the site in the RCRAInfo Corrective Action Workload Universe is the method by which a site is determined to be active.This definition may be revised.
State-specific ActivitiesActivities, other than those listed under the previous four subcategories, which a state regulates and tracks in RCRAInfo and whose presence at a site the state considers sufficient reason to determine the site to be "active." These additional activities may be "same as," "more stringent than," or "broader in scope" than federal regulations. They are generally state variants of SI or TSD activities. 
Federal regulations do not require a subsequent notification if a non-treatment, storage, or disposal facility (TSDF) changes its status (requirements vary from state to state); however, TSDFs are required to notify when owner/operator information changes. Therefore, non-TSDF data may show a site activity status that is no longer current at the site.
SDWA systems are designated as Active or Inactive. SDWA systems activity status definitions are described below.
  • Active - A system is active if it produces drinking water on a regular basis. A seasonal water system may also be considered active if it is expected to resume operation within the year.
  • Inactive - Not active. This includes systems that have gone out of business or been merged into other drinking water systems.
Areas
Displays Clean Air Act stationary source program code, Clean Water Act-NPDES permit component(s), and/or other Resource Conservation and Recovery Act designations, if any. For SDWA, displays the estimated average daily population served by a water system. For GHG, displays a list of the industries under which the facility is subject to report as part of the Greenhouse Gas Reporting ProgramReview a list of covered types of industrial operations and informational resources.
Permit Expiration Date (CWA only)
Date on which a given Clean Water Act-NPDES permit is scheduled to expire. An expired date does not mean the facility is operating without a permit. In most cases, the facility has applied for a permit renewal, but the responsible authority (local, state, or federal) has not completed the re-issuance. Typically facilities operate under the conditions of the expired permit until the renewal has been processed. Some states are experiencing a backlog in issuing permit renewals, particularly under the Clean Water Act. EPA suggests contacting the relevant state agency for more information about permit renewal status. In these situations, the expired permit is normally administratively extended and kept in effect until the new permit is issued.
Indian Country
A value of "N/A" (Not Applicable) indicates this information is not maintained in the program data system. "N" indicates the facility is not in Indian Country, and a value of "Y" indicates the facility is in Indian Country according to the source database.
Latitude/Longitude
The latitude and longitude of the facility or permit holder as maintained in each data system.

Facility Address Table

System
The data source associated with the additional facility information.
  • AIR - ICIS-Air
  • EIS - Emissions Inventory System
  • FRS - Facility Registry Service
  • GHG - Greenhouse Gas Emissions
  • ICP - ICIS National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (ICIS-NPDES)
  • RCR - Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Information (RCRAInfo)
  • RMP - Clean Air Act Risk Management Plan Program
  • SDWIS - Safe Drinking Water Information System
  • TRI - Toxics Release Inventory
  • TSCA - Toxic Substances Control Act
Statute
Identifies the environmental statute associated with each of the permits and identifiers linked to the facility. The first row of this table is typically FRS data, which are not associated with a particular statute.
  • CAA — Clean Air Act
  • CWA — Clean Water Act
  • RCRA — Resource Conservation and Recovery Act
  • SDWA — Safe Drinking Water Act
  • EP313 — Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act, Section 313 (i.e., the Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) program)
  • TSCA - Toxic Substances Control Act
  • RMP - Risk Management Plan Rule
  • CAMD - Clean Air Markets Division
Identifier
An alphanumeric field that displays the source database abbreviation and the unique value assigned for each record/permit/site within each data system. These identifiers are for tracking purposes in the individual data systems. The identifier used in the federal ICIS-Air database is typically different from the permit number issued to the facility.
Facility Name
Company or permit holder name, as maintained by each data system. The facility name may differ across EPA databases due to differences in reported information, change in ownership, use of parent or subsidiary name, etc.
Facility Address
Street address where the facility is located, as maintained by each data system. The street address may differ across EPA databases due to differences in reported information (e.g., use of mailing address), change in ownership, use of parent or subsidiary address, etc.
 

Facility SIC Codes Table

System
The data source associated with the additional facility information.
  • AIR - ICIS-Air
  • EIS - Emissions Inventory System
  • FRS - Facility Registry Service
  • GHG - Greenhouse Gas Emissions
  • ICP - ICIS National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (ICIS-NPDES)
  • RCR - Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Information (RCRAInfo)
  • SDWIS - Safe Drinking Water Information System
  • TRI - Toxics Release Inventory
Identifier
An alphanumeric field that displays the source database abbreviation and the unique value assigned for each record/permit/site within each data system. These identifiers are for tracking purposes in the individual data systems. The identifier used in the federal ICIS-Air database is typically different from the permit number issued to the facility.
SIC Code
Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) codes, as maintained by each data system. Some SIC codes may reflect historical activities at a facility. SIC codes were established by the Census Bureau to identify processes, products and services. Each data system has different criteria for incorporating this information.
SIC Description
Description of the associated SIC Code.

Facility NAICS Codes Table

System
The data source associated with the additional facility information.
  • AIR - ICIS-Air
  • EIS - Emissions Inventory System
  • FRS - Facility Registry Service
  • GHG - Greenhouse Gas Emissions
  • ICP - ICIS National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (ICIS-NPDES)
  • RCR - Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Information (RCRAInfo)
  • RMP - Clean Air Act Risk Management Plan Program
  • SDWIS - Safe Drinking Water Information System
  • TRI - Toxics Release Inventory
Identifier
An alphanumeric field that displays the source database abbreviation and the unique value assigned for each record/permit/site within each data system. These identifiers are for tracking purposes in the individual data systems. The identifier used in the federal ICIS-Air database is typically different from the permit number issued to the facility.
NAICS Code
All NAICS codes associated with the facility, as maintained in each data system. Some NAICS codes may reflect historical activities at a facility. The North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) has replaced the U.S. Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) system. For detailed information about NAICS and for a crosswalk between NAICS and SIC codes, please check the U.S. Census Bureau NAICS page.
NAICS Description
Description of the associated 6-digit NAICS Code

Facility Tribe Information Table

The Facility Tribe Information table displays the tribes or tribal territories located within 25 miles of the facility's location. EPA compares the facility location in its Facility Registry Service to the U.S. Census Bureau 2010 tribal boundary layer data for tribes in the lower 48 states and Bureau of Land Management Alaska State Office data for tribes in Alaska. The tribal boundary locations identified are suitable only for general spatial reference and do not necessarily reflect EPA's position on any Indian country locations or boundaries, or the land status of any specific location.

Reservation Name
Name of the Indian country reservation that the facility is located on or near.
Tribal Name
Name of the tribe located within the boundary locations that the facility is located on or near.
EPA Tribal ID
ID given by EPA to identify the tribe.
Distance to Tribe (miles)
The facility's distance in miles to the tribe or tribal territory.

Data Quality Caveat: EPA makes no claims regarding the accuracy or precision of data concerning Indian country locations or boundaries on the ECHO website. EPA has simply attempted to collect certain readily available information relating to Indian country locations. Questions concerning data should be referred to the originating program or Agency which can be identified in the Envirofacts tribal query metadata files Lower48 Tribal AreasAlaska ReservationAlaska Native Villages, or Alaska Native Allotments. The Indian country locations shown here are suitable only for general spatial reference and do not necessarily reflect EPA's position on any Indian country locations or boundaries or the land status of any specific location. The inclusion of Indian country information on the ECHO website does not represent any final EPA action addressing Indian country locations or boundaries. This information cannot be relied upon to create any rights, substantive or procedural, enforceable by any party in litigation with the United States or third parties. EPA reserves the right to change information on ECHO at any time without public notice.

EPA uses the U.S. Census Bureau 2010 tribal boundary layer data when developing environmental data query responses for tribes in the lower 48 United States and Bureau of Land Management Alaska State Office when developing environmental data query responses for tribes in Alaska. The tribal boundary locations identified are suitable only for general spatial reference and do not necessarily reflect EPA's position on any Indian country locations or boundaries, or the land status of any specific location. EPA seeks to use the best available national federal data and may refine the tribal boundary layer in the future as more accurate national federal data becomes available.

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Enforcement and Compliance

Key Terms

Violation, non-compliance, significant non-compliance, and high priority violation are all terms used by the ECHO website to describe the facility's status in regard to compliance with the law. In many cases, these terms reflect determinations made by EPA or states when conducting inspections or reviewing facility self-reports. These determinations assist the government in tracking resolution of violations through the enforcement process and do not necessarily represent a final adjudication by a judicial or administrative body. In such cases, these characterizations should be considered alleged violations. Additional information on how to interpret a facility's compliance status is available on ECHO's Frequently Asked Questions page.

This section summarizes the history of enforcement and compliance activities.

Filter Enforcement and Compliance Information

Radio buttons allow you to restrict the data displayed in each of the Enforcement and Compliance tables to a particular statute (CAA, CWA, RCRA, or SDWA). The number in parentheses after each statute indicates the number of compliance monitoring activities listed in the Compliance Monitoring History table for that statute.

Compliance Monitoring History (5 years)

The Compliance Monitoring History table lists inspections/compliance evaluations that have occurred under the following environmental statutes over the past five years.

Inspections include all federal and state inspections that are reported into federal data systems using federally-designed codes. Italicized entries include various compliance monitoring activities that do not qualify as inspections under EPA's official Office of Enforcement and Compliance Assurance performance measures.

Statute
Identifies the environmental statute associated with each of the permits and identifiers linked to the facility:
  • CAA — Clean Air Act
  • CWA — Clean Water Act
  • EP313 — Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act, Section 313 (i.e., the Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) program)
  • FIFRA — Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act
  • RCRA — Resource Conservation and Recovery Act
  • SDWA — Safe Drinking Water Act
  • TSCA — Toxic Substances Control Act
Source ID
An alphanumeric field, which is a unique value for each record/permit/site within each data system. These identifiers are for tracking purposes in the individual data systems.
System
The data source associated with the additional facility information.
  • AIR - ICIS-Air
  • EIS - Emissions Inventory System
  • FRS - Facility Registry Service
  • GHG - Greenhouse Gas Emissions
  • ICIS - Integrated Compliance Information System
  • ICP - ICIS National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (ICIS-NPDES)
  • RCR - Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Information (RCRAInfo)
  • SDWIS - Safe Drinking Water Information System
  • TRI - Toxics Release Inventory
Inspection Type
A description of the type of inspection undertaken. The Detailed Facility Report includes inspections which were conducted within the last five years. The last five years will include data from the twenty most recently completed quarters, plus data from the current quarter up until the refresh date. Italicized inspection types are not part of EPA official counts. The following inspection types are included in official counts:
Clean Air Act (CAA)
A Full Compliance Evaluation (FCE) includes comprehensive paperwork review and often, but not necessarily, an on-site inspection. The following compliance evaluation types are "credited" as official evaluations:
  • FCE On-Site (EPA or State conducted)
  • FCE Off-Site (EPA or State conducted)
Compliance evaluations that do not qualify as FCEs are characterized as "partial." Partial means that some compliance monitoring was done, but all requirements were not met to receive credit for a Full Compliance Evaluation. The following compliance evaluation types are not included in official counts and indicate partial compliance evaluations:
  • PFF - PCE Off-Site
  • PCE - PCE On-Site
  • POI - PCE On-Site Interview
  • POM - PCE On-Site Monitoring/Sampling
  • POR - PCE On-Site Record/Report Review
  • POV - PCE On-Site Visible Emission Observation
  • CST - Stack Test
  • TVA - Title V Annual Compliance Certification (TV ACC) Receipt/Review
Stack Tests: Following a Clean Air Act source or performance stack test listed in the Compliance Monitoring History table, the "Finding" column includes the result of the stack test (Pass, Fail, Pending, or Blank) along with the pollutant tested, if it is reported. Please note that the pollutant tested is not required to be reported, although it is recommended.
A stack test, also referred to in EPA regulations as a performance or source test, measures the amount of specific regulated pollutant(s) or surrogates being emitted; demonstrates the capture efficiency of a capture system; or determines the destruction or removal efficiency of a control device used to reduce emissions at facilities subject to the requirements of the Clean Air Act. Stack tests are discussed in the Clean Air Act Stationary Source Compliance Monitoring Strategy (CMS), which provides recommendations to state and local environmental agencies to encourage national consistency in developing stationary source air compliance monitoring programs.
Title V Annual Compliance Certification (TV ACC Receipt/Review): Following a Title V Annual Compliance Certification Review or Title V Annual Compliance Certification Due/Received action, the Finding column includes the result of the review (In Compliance, In Violation, or Unknown), as well as whether any deviations were reported (Yes or No). Note: These actions may be performed and reported by a state permit authority or an EPA regional office, which also receives these documents from the permitted facilities as required in the permit and EPA Title V regulations. The CAA Stationary Source CMS provides details.
The results of performance stack tests conducted and of Title V Certification Reviews are required to be reported to the national program database, ICIS-Air (AIR), based on the Information Collection Request. Regarding stack test results, as noted above, EPA does not require that the pollutant tested be reported. However, a violation of a major facility's allowable emission limit detected during a stack test may trigger a high priority violation status, according to the policy on the Timely and Appropriate Enforcement Response to High Priority Violations (HPV Policy).
Detailed information is available from the following links/documents:

Information on additional CAA inspections: In addition to the compliance evaluations from ICIS-AIR, the national database for the stationary source program, EPA inspections under the following CAA sections are displayed when recorded in the Integrated Compliance Information System (ICIS): 112(r), 118(d), 202, 203, 207, 208, 211, 213, and 219.

Clean Water Act (CWA) - National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System Program (NPDES)

  • ADR - Asbestos Demolition and Renovation
  • AER - Aerial Photography
  • AFD - AFO Defined
  • AFN - AFO Designation
  • AU1 - Audit
  • AU2 - Audit
  • CAI - Compliance Assistance Inspection
  • CBI - Biomonitoring
  • CCP - Citizen Complaint
  • CDI - Case Development
  • CEF - Full Evaluation
  • CEI - Evaluation
  • CEP - Partial Evaluation
  • CE2 - Evaluation
  • DIA - Diagnostic
  • FLP - Follow-Up
  • FOC - Focused
  • OPM - Operation and Maintenance
  • OSN - Non-Compliance Rate
  • OSV - On Site Visit
  • OVS - Oversight
  • PIU - Non-Sampling
  • PRV - Plan Review
  • PSI - Sampling
  • RMT - Remote Sensing
  • ROS - Reconnaissance without Sampling
  • RWS - Reconnaissance with Sampling
  • SA1 - Sampling
  • SCE - Schedule Evaluation
  • TX1 - Toxics
  • TX2 - Toxics
  • WIT - Witness Response Drill

Italics indicate inspections that aren't included in official countsThe CWA National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System Compliance Monitoring Strategy lists the acceptable ICIS-NPDES compliance monitoring types for different types of facilities in a traditional Compliance Monitoring Strategy plan.

Information on additional CWA inspections: In addition to the NPDES inspections from ICIS-NPDES, the national database for the CWA direct discharge program, EPA inspections under the following CWA sections are displayed when recorded in the Integrated Compliance Information System (ICIS): 311 and 404.

Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) hazardous waste inspection types

  • CAC - Corrective Action Compliance Evaluation
  • CAV - Compliance Assistance Visit
  • CDI - Case Development Inspection
  • CEI - Compliance Evaluation Inspection
  • CSE - Compliance Schedule Evaluation
  • FCI - Focused Compliance
  • FRR - Financial Record Review
  • FSD - Facility Self Disclosure
  • FUI - Follow-Up Inspection
  • GME - Groundwater Monitoring Evaluation
  • NRR - Non-Financial Record Review
  • OAM - Operation and Maintenance Inspection
Italics indicate inspections that aren't included in official counts. RCRA inspection types are further described in the Nationally Defined Values for Evaluation Type file (3 pp, 12 K, About PDF) from the source data system, RCRAInfo. RCRA "official" inspections are those that tend to take place on site. Financial Record Reviews and Non-Financial Record Reviews are evaluations of compliance, but they typically take place in the regulatory agency office.  
Information on additional RCRA inspections: In addition to the RCRA hazardous waste (Subtitle C) inspections from RCRAInfo, the national database for hazardous waste data, EPA inspections under the following RCRA sections are displayed when recorded in the Integrated Compliance Information System (ICIS): 9002, 9003, 9005, and 9006.
Emergency Planning and Community Right to Know Act (EPCRA) Section 313
  • EEA - EPCRA, Enforcement, Senior Environmental Employee (SEE) Conducted
  • EEF - EPCRA, Enforcement, Federal Conducted
  • EDA - EPCRA, Data Quality, Senior Environmental Employee (SEE) Conducted
  • EDF - EPCRA, Data Quality, Federal Conducted
Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA)
  • 13I - Section 13 Importer Inspection
  • 2XP - Section 12 Export
  • 4CI - Section 4 Inspections
  • 4LP - Section 4 Good Laboratory Practices
  • 5CE - Section 5 Chemical Substance Exemption
  • 5CI - Section 5 Inspections
  • 5CF - Section 5 Order
  • 5FN - Section 5 Failure to Notify
  • 5PM - Section 5 Premanufacture Notice
  • 5SU - Section 5 Significant New Use Rule
  • 5TM - Section 5 Test Marketing Exemption
  • 6AA - Section 6 Asbestos Senior Environmental Employee (SEE) Conducted
  • 6AF - Section 6 Asbestos Federal Conducted
  • 6CI - Section 6 Inspections
  • 6DR - Section 6 Hexavalent Chromium
  • 6DX - Section 6 Dioxin
  • 6PA - Section 6 Polychlorinated Biphenyls Senior Environmental Employee (SEE) Conducted
  • 6PF - Section 6 PCB Federal Conducted
  • 6WA - Section 6 Asbestos Worker Protection Senior Environmental Employee (SEE)
  • 6WF - Section 6 Asbestos Worker Protection Federal
  • 8CI - Section 8 Confidential Inspections
  • 8CR - Section 8C Records Rule
  • 8HS - Section 8D Health and Safety Studies
  • 8LA - Section 8A Level A Rule
  • 8NV - Section 8 Inventory Rule
  • 8SR - Section 8E Substantial Risk
  • ACO - Asbestos School Hazard Abatement Act (ASHAA) Close Out
  • AEA - Asbestos Hazard Emergency Response Act (AHERA), Enforcement, Senior Environmental Employee (SEE) Conducted
  • AEF - Asbestos Hazard Emergency Response Act (AHERA), Enforcement, Federal Conducted
  • AMA - Asbestos, Model Accreditation Plan (MAP) Enforcement, Senior Environmental Employee (SEE)
  • AMF - Asbestos, Model Accreditation Plan (MAP) Enforcement, Federal
  • AON - Asbestos, Asbestos School Hazard Abatement Act Ongoing
  • APA - Asbestos, Asbestos School Hazard Abatement Act (ASHAA) Pre Award
  • AUN - Asbestos, Asbestos School Hazard Abatement Act (ASHAA) Unfunded
  • L2A - Lead, Section 402, Senior Environmental Employee (SEE)
  • L2F - Lead, Section 402, Federal
  • L4A - Lead, Section 404, Senior Environmental Employee (SEE)
  • L4F - Lead, Section 404, Federal
  • L6A - Lead, Section 406, Senior Environmental Employee (SEE)
  • L6F - Lead, Section 406, Federal
  • L8A - Lead, Section 408, Senior Environmental Employee (SEE)
  • L8F - Lead, Section 408, Federal
  • 6AS - Section 6 Asbestos State Conducted
  • 6CS - State Hexavalent Chromium
  • 6PS - Section 6 PCP State Conducted
  • 6WS - Section 6 Asbestos Worker Protection State
  • AES - Asbestos Hazard Emergency Response Act (AHERA), Enforcement, State Conducted
  • AMS - Asbestos, Model Accreditation Plan (MAP) Enforcement, State
  • L2S - Lead, Section 402, State
  • L4S - Lead, Section 404, State
  • L6S - Lead, Section 406, State
Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act (FIFRA)
  • EUP - Experimental Use Permit
  • FTR - Section 7, Failure to Report
  • MPT - Import
  • RGA - Use Restricted/General Agriculture
  • RGN - Use Restricted/General Non-Agriculture
  • RRV - Records Review
  • UGA - Use General Agriculture
  • URA - Use General Non-Agriculture
  • URN - Use Restricted Non-Agriculture
  • XPT - Export
Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA)
  • CCR - Consumer Confidence Report Rule
  • CHRD - Chem/Rad, part of the Phase II/V Rules
  • DBPR - Stage 1 Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule
  • IESW - Interim Enhanced Surface Water Treatment Rule
  • LEAD - Lead and Copper Rule
  • NITR - Nitrate, part of the Phase II/V Rules
  • PNR - Public Notification Rule
  • SWTR - Surface Water Treatment Rule
  • TCR - Total Coliform Rule
  • UNRG - Unregulated Contaminant Monitoring Rule

Additional information on SDWA inspections: EPA inspections under the following SDWA sections are displayed when recorded in the Integrated Compliance Information System (ICIS): 1412, 1414, 1415(b)(1), 1416, 1417, 1421, 1422, 1423, 1431, 1432, 1433, 1441, and 1445.

Lead Agency
Identifies the lead agency (e.g., EPA, State) conducting the inspection.
Date
The calendar date of the listed inspection.
Finding
For CAA: includes results of source or performance stack tests or Title V certification review results, when applicable.
For CWA and RCRA: includes whether violations or compliance issues were found during an inspection, if entered into an EPA system.
For SDWA: includes whether violations or compliance issues were found during a sanitary survey or other kind of site visit.

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SDWA Sanitary Survey Results (5 years)

Includes occurrences of sanitary surveys and other kinds of site visits, including technical assistance, sample collections, and site inspections.

Date
The calendar date (MM/DD/YYYY) of the listed site visit.
Type
A description of the type of site visit conducted.
Agency
The lead agency that conducted the site visit.
Sanitary Survey Results
Every public water system is required to be evaluated by a sanitary survey every three to five years. A sanitary survey is an on-site review of a system's water source, facilities, equipment, operation, and maintenance, intended to point out sanitary deficiencies and assess the system's capability to supply safe drinking water. Systems are evaluated on 11 different aspects of public water system (PWS) operation, and the results are recorded using the following codes:
CodeResult Description
MMinor Deficiencies
NNo Deficiencies or Recommendations
RRecommendations Made
SSignificant Deficiencies
XNot Evaluated
ZNot Applicable
--Not Reported to EPA

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Compliance Summary Data

Includes inspections/compliance evaluations that have occurred under the following environmental statutes over the past five years:

  • Clean Air Act (CAA)
  • Clean Water Act (CWA)
  • Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA)
  • Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA)
  • Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act (FIFRA)
  • Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Acts (EPCRA)
  • Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA)
Statute
Identifies the environmental statute associated with each of the permits and identifiers linked to the facility:
  • CAA — Clean Air Act
  • CWA — Clean Water Act
  • RCRA — Resource Conservation and Recovery Act
  • TSCA — Toxic Substances Control Act
  • EP313 — Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act, Section 313 (i.e., the Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) program)
  • SDWA — Safe Drinking Water Act
Source ID
An alphanumeric field, which is a unique value for each record/permit/site within each data system. These identifiers are for tracking purposes in the individual data systems.
Current SNC/HPV
The current Significant Non-compliance (SNC) or High Priority Violator (HPV) status for the facility during the most current quarter reflects the time the records were extracted from the program data systems. SNC is used for RCRA and CWA, and HPV is used for CAA. Each program has its own specific criteria for making this determination. The value of "Yes" indicates the facility is in SNC or HPV for the permit or site in question and may pose a more severe level of environmental threat. The value of "No" indicates the permit or site is not considered in SNC or HPV.
If the facility is Non-Federally Reportable within ICIS-Air, the field reads "N/A". The value of N/A in this field indicates Not Applicable because compliance data for these facilities are not required to be reported to the national program database. When data are available, this field will indicate the compliance status for some minor facilities in ICIS-NPDES. For minor facilities in ICIS-NPDES, N/A indicates that EPA's data system is not able to determine the facility-level compliance status based upon the information available. For the RCRA program, some hazardous waste facilities have activities in multiple states. When the SNC activity location is not the same as the state where the facility is located, the state of the SNC activity location is displayed in parentheses. A "Yes" by itself indicates that the facility has a SNC activity location in the state where the facility is located. A brief summary of each program's definition is shown below. However, these summaries are not meant to substitute for the complete definition, which can be found in the relevant guidance documents for a given program.
Significant Non-Compliance Definitions by Statute
Air High Priority Violation (HPV) Definition
The Air program uses the term HPV. HPV designations are made according to the Issuance of Policy on Timely and Appropriate Enforcement Response to High Priority Violations.
The following criteria can trigger HPV status for a violation that occurs at a Title-V major source or a non-Title-V major source subject to a Compliance Monitoring Strategy (CMS) plan:
  • Failure to obtain a New Source Review (NSR) permit and/or install Best Available Control Technology or Lowest Available Emission Reductions for any new major stationary source or major modifications at a major stationary source.
  • Exceedance of a major stationary source annual emission threshold, as defined in the NSR regulations, by a synthetic minor stationary source.
  • Violation of the any emission limitation, emission standard, or operating parameter that has continued for at least seven days, but not necessarily continuous, according to:
    • Title I, Part C or D, of the Clean Air Act and implementing regulations,
    • Standards of Performance for New Sources (NSPS) Part 60, or
    • National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) Parts 61 and 63.
  • Violations of federally enforceable work practices, testing requirements, monitoring requirements, recordkeeping or reporting that substantially interferes with enforcement or determination of a facility’s compliance requirements.
  • Violations specifically identified and communicated to enforcement agencies by the U.S. EPA Air Enforcement Division Director, or as mutually agreed upon between the enforcement agency and corresponding EPA Region.
The HPV designation is removed for a given source when all federal and state administrative and judicial action against the source is complete, the source has completed all requirements under the consent decree or final order including payment of all penalties and completion of supplemental environmental projects, and the source has been confirmed to be complying with the CAA.
The High Priority Violation (HPV) flag is reported in ICIS-Air, as of the last update. A 'Yes' appears in the column to indicate that the facility has HPV status. Below is a list of violation codes within ICIS-Air that translate to HPV status.
  • Addrs-EPA - Addressed, EPA Lead
  • Addrs-State - Addressed, State Lead
  • Addrs-Local - Addressed, Local Lead
  • Unaddr-EPA - Unaddressed, EPA Lead
  • Unaddr-State - Unaddressed, State Lead
  • Unaddr-Local - Unaddressed, Local Lead
The status of "Addressed" indicates that a formal enforcement action has been taken against the facility but its violations have not yet been resolved, or that a decision not to take a formal action has been made. For the CAA, violations are not considered resolved until the source is in full physical compliance and all penalties are paid. "Unaddressed" indicates that the facility's violations have not yet been addressed with a formal enforcement action or the decision to do so has not yet been made.
CWA Significant Non-Compliance (SNC) Definition
The National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) program uses the term SNC. SNC designations are made in accordance with the December 12, 1996 guidance document: General Design for SNC Redefinition Enhancement in PCS (PDF) (27 pp, 2.8 MB, About PDF). Most SNC designations are based on an automated analysis of Discharge Monitoring Reports (DMRs) that facilities with NPDES permits are required to submit on a monthly basis. The compliance designation of a facility in the ICIS-NPDES database is done using a mathematical formula that takes into account the amount, duration, and frequency of discharges in comparison with permit levels. In some instances facilities may be manually designated as SNC, even if the ICIS-NPDES data system does not automatically designate them as such. Examples of events that could result in the manual generation of a SNC code for a facility include: unauthorized discharges; failure of a Publicly Owned Treatment Works (POTW) to enforce its approved pretreatment program; failure to meet a construction deadline; failure to file a DMR; filing a DMR more than 30 days late; or violating any judicial or administrative order. Manually entered compliance data, if present, override machine-generated compliance data.
A facility may have multiple discharge points and different designations for each point. If any of these points show a SNC type code, then the overall facility status is listed as SNC, even if other discharge points are in compliance.
Removal of the SNC designation occurs once the facility's DMR reports show a consistent pattern of compliance with permit limits, or if EPA or a state agency issues a formal enforcement order to address the violations that resulted in the SNC designation and the facility has returned to compliance.
The most recent quarter for ICIS-NPDES is the most recent official quarter for which the quarterly status is available. This is usually 2 1/2 months after the quarter has ended. Thus, the most recent quarter in ICIS-NPDES is often not the same quarter as that for ICIS-Air and RCRAInfo.
The following are NPDES Quarterly Non-compliance Report codes that translate to SNC status (from most to least important):
  • S = SNC - an enforcement action has been issued, and the facility is not meeting its compliance schedule
  • E = SNC - effluent violations of monthly average limits (Technical Review Criteria and chronic)
  • X = SNC - effluent violations of non-monthly average limits (Technical Review Criteria and chronic)
  • T = SNC - compliance schedule reporting violation
  • D = SNC - reporting violation - non-receipt of DMR
RCRA Significant Non-Compliance (SNC) Definition
The RCRA program uses the term SNC. Any determination to classify a site as a SNC is made using the guidelines set forth in the December 2003 Hazardous Waste Civil Enforcement Response Policy (PDF) (14 pp, 145 K, About PDF). A site can be designated as a SNC if any of the following are found to exist: the site has been determined to cause actual exposure or has a substantial likelihood of causing exposure to a hazardous waste or constituent; is a chronic or recalcitrant violator; or deviates substantially from the terms of a permit, order or agreement, or from RCRA statutory or regulatory requirements. Under the RCRA program, the SNC designation is removed for a given site when the site is in full physical compliance with statutory and/or regulatory requirements.
SDWA Serious Violator Definition
In the Safe Drinking Water program, a Serious Violator is a public water system with unresolved serious, multiple, and/or continuing violations, as identified by the quarterly application of EPA's Drinking Water Enforcement Response Policy (PDF) (16 pp, 952 K, About PDF), that must either return to compliance or be addressed by a formal enforcement action within six months.
EPA designates serious violators so that the drinking water system and the primacy agency will act quickly to resolve the most significant drinking water violations. Many public water systems with violations, however, are not serious violators. Operators and the primacy agencies are expected to correct the violations at non-serious violators as well, but without the more strict requirements and deadlines applicable to serious violators. If the violations at a non-serious violator are left uncorrected, that system may become a serious violator. When a serious violator has returned to compliance, it is no longer designated a serious violator. EPA updates its serious violator list on a quarterly basis.
Description
The text description for the event that resulted in the permit or site being in Significant Non-compliance (SNC), High Priority Violation (HPV), or designated as a Serious Violator.
Current As Of
The most recent date or calendar year quarter of record maintained in the data system for which the Current SNC/HPV status applies. A quarter could be any of the following 3-month periods: January-March, April-June, July-September, or October-December.
Qtrs in NC (of 12)
Count of the number of quarters, out of the last twelve quarters, in which the permit or site is considered either with violations, in non-compliance (NC) status, or in Significant Non-compliance (SNC) or High Priority Violation (HPV) status, as shown in the following section. A quarter is any of the following 3-month calendar periods: January-March, April-June, July-September, or October-December. Further violation and detailed compliance information can be found on ECHO's Frequently Asked Question page.

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Three Year Compliance Status by Quarter

Key Terms

Violation, non-compliance, significant non-compliance, and high priority violation are all terms used by the ECHO website to describe the facility's status in regard to compliance with the law. In many cases, these terms reflect determinations made by EPA or states when conducting inspections or reviewing facility self-reports. These determinations assist the government in tracking resolution of violations through the enforcement process and do not necessarily represent a final adjudication by a judicial or administrative body. In such cases, these characterizations should be considered alleged violations. Additional information on how to interpret a facility's compliance status is available on ECHO's Frequently Asked Questions page.

The Three Year Compliance Status by Quarter section of the Detailed Facility Report displays compliance status data over the last three years of available data. Information is broken down into quarterly periods listed as QTR1 through QTR12 (most recent). The quarter is used as the measurement period because it is the shortest measurement period across all three statutes for which EPA receives non-compliance data from states.

Violation information is displayed in a different manner for each statute. This is due to differences in how violations are tracked within each data system.

Violation – Defined as non-compliance with one or more legally enforceable obligations by a regulated entity, as determined by a responsible authority. Included in this category are violations of legally enforceable obligations under pre-existing Final Orders (e.g., violations of compliance schedules included in enforcement orders). What does it mean if a facility is in violation?

The quarterly status measure may not reflect all actual non-compliance events in some cases. For example, EPA does not require national reporting for facilities with "minor" permits; thus, non-compliance at these facilities may not be completely shown in ECHO. For minor facilities, the authorized state may have information on violations not found in ECHO. Also, delays sometimes occur in entering non-compliance determinations into the database. Alternatively, in some cases, a facility may be shown to be in non-compliance while the facility has already remedied the underlying violation; this may occur because EPA or the state has not yet verified this. In other cases, the state or EPA may change its initial determination of non-compliance based on additional facts or discussions with the facility. Site users may report possible errors concerning non-compliance status from the facility report screen.

Notice About Duration of Violations - The duration of violations shown on this report is an estimate of the actual duration of the violations that might be alleged or later determined in a legal proceeding. For example, the start date of the violation as shown in the ECHO database is normally when the government first became aware of the violation, not the first date that the violation occurred, and the facility may have corrected the violation before the end date shown. In some situations, violations may have been corrected by the facility, but EPA or the State has not verified the correction of these violations. In other situations, EPA does not remove the violation flag until an enforcement action has been resolved.

Statute
Identifies the environmental statute associated with each of the permits and identifiers linked to the facility:
  • CAA — Clean Air Act
  • CWA — Clean Water Act
  • RCRA — Resource Conservation and Recovery Act
  • SDWA — Safe Drinking Water Act
Quarters (QRT)
A quarter is any of the following 3-month calendar periods: January-March, April-June, July-September, or October-December. Because quality assurance protocols differ among the data systems, the last twelve complete quarters of record may differ across EPA data systems.
Facility-Level Compliance Status by Quarter
Displays an indication of the compliance status for each statute under which the facility is regulated by quarter. Status codes include:
  • No Violations – Blue
  • Noncompliance - Yellow-orange
  • Significant Non-compliance (SNC) (CWA and RCRA), High Priority Violation (HPV) (CAA), or Serious Violator (SDWA) – Red
  • No Information - Gray
Compliance Status Designations by Program
Detailed information on program, pollutant, violation type and compliance status designations are below, organized by statute:
Air Compliance Status (CAA)
HPV History - The High Priority Violation (HPV) flag as reported in ICIS-Air. A blank in this column means that the facility is not currently a High Priority Violator (HPV). If more than one flag applies to a facility during a quarter, a prioritization is used to determine which code appears. The order of precedence is as follows:
  • Addrs-EPA - Addressed, EPA Lead
  • Addrs-State - Addressed, State Lead
  • Addrs-Local - Addressed, Local Lead
  • Unaddr-EPA - Unaddressed, EPA Lead
  • Unaddr-State - Unaddressed, State Lead
  • Unaddr-Local - Unaddressed, Local Lead
The status of "Addressed" indicates that a formal action has been taken against the facility but its violations have not yet been resolved, or that a decision not to take a formal action has been made. For the CAA, violations are not considered resolved until the source is in full physical compliance and all penalties are paid. "Unaddressed" indicates that the facility's violations have not yet been addressed with a formal enforcement action or the decision to do so has not yet been made.
Violation Type - Indicates whether a violation is a High Priority Violation (HPV) or a Federally Reportable Violation (FRV). HPVs are violations of the CAA that meet the criteria in EPA's Enforcement Response to High Priority Violations Policy. The Guidance on Federally-Reportable Violations for Stationary Air Sources outlines the types of violations that state, local, and tribal agencies are to report to EPA.
Programs/Agency/Pollutants - For Clean Air Act (CAA) permits, the table provides quarterly status information for each air permit, and within each permit, the programs to which the facility or operation is subject. Within each CAA program, individual pollutants for which the facility is in current violation are listed on a separate line. The table also identifies the environmental agency addressing the violation. For a list of state environmental agency websites, see Access State Websites. In general, data relating to Federally-reportable facilities (see Facility Characteristics Section) is considered more reliable.
CAA programs include:
  • CAAAR - Acid Rain Deposition Control (CAA Title IV)
  • CAABAC - Best Available Controls
  • CAACCP - Consumer or Commercial Products
  • CAACFC - CFC Tracking (CAA Title VI)
  • CAAEP - Emergency Powers
  • CAAFENF - Federally-Enforceable Requirement, Non Specified
  • CAAFESOP -Federally-Enforceable State Operating Permit - Non Title V
  • CAAFF - Federal Facilities
  • CAAFIP - Federal Implementation Plan for National Primary and Secondary Ambient Air Quality Standards
  • CAAGACTM - 40 CFR Part 63 Area Sources
  • CAAGHG -The Mandatory Greenhouse Gas Reporting Rule
  • CAAHAPS - Hazardous Air Pollutants
  • CAAIRM - Information Requests, Monitoring, & Recordkeeping
  • CAAL - Labeling
  • CAAMACT - MACT Standards (40 CFR Part 63)
  • CAAMRR - Monitoring, Reporting
  • CAAMS -Mobile Sources
  • CAANAAQS - National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS)
  • CAANAM - Tribal Rule Not Otherwise Covered
  • CAANEP - Non Essential Products
  • CAANEPA - National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA)
  • CAANESH - National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (40 CFR Part 61)
  • CAANFRP - Not defined as federally-reportable
  • CAANSP - Nonattainment/SIP Provisions
  • CAANSPS - New Source Performance Standards
  • CAANSPSM - New Source Performance Standards (Non-Major)
  • CAANSR - New Source Review Permit Requirements
  • CAANVCO - Notices of Violations & Compliance Orders
  • CAAOP - Operating Permits
  • CAAOTH - State or Local rule or regulation that is not federally-enforceable
  • CAAPARGDC - Prevention of Accidental Release/General Duty Clause
  • CAAPR - Permit Requirements
  • CAAPSD - Prevention of Significant Deterioration of Air Quality
  • CAAPSDPR - PSD Preconstruction Requirements
  • CAARERP - Recycling & Emission Reduction Programs
  • CAARMP - Risk Management Program
  • CAASIP - State Implementation Plan for National Primary and Secondary Ambient Air Quality Standards
  • CAASMVA - Servicing Motor Vehicle ACs
  • CAASO - Stratospheric Ozone Protection
  • CAASPP - State Permit Programs
  • CAASWFC - Solid Waste Fuel Combustion
  • CAATIP - Tribal Implementation Plan for National Primary and Secondary Ambient Air Quality Standards
  • CAATVP - Title V Permits
  • CAATVS - Tank Vessel Standards
Quarterly Status (CAA)
  • Dates - High Priority Violations (HPV) are listed with the beginning and return-to-compliance dates across the twelve quarters. A report showing a right arrow with no closing date (e.g., ">>>") means that the violation has not been resolved and continues to be active in the data system. If the violation started before the last three years of data and continues into the last three years, the beginning date is listed in QTR1. Federally Reportable Violations (FRV) are listed with the determination date or date reported in the appropriate quarter.
     
  • V = Violation. The following codes indicate that an alleged violation of a CAA permit or regulatory program has been found by a delegated agency or the EPA:
    • V-NO SCH – In violation, no enforcement action has been issued specifying a compliance schedule
    • V-N SCH – In violation, an enforcement action has been issued, and the facility is not meeting its compliance schedule
    • V-UNKNOWN – In violation, unknown w/regard to schedule
    • V-EM&PRO – In violation, with regard to emissions and procedure (reporting requirements)
    • V-PROCED – In violation, with regard to procedural compliance (reporting requirements)
  • S = Compliance Schedule. The following code indicates that a CAA source is operating under the requirements of an enforcement schedule:
    • S-MSched – Meeting compliance schedule
The following codes are used in ICIS-Air as placeholders:
  • SEE Other – Present, used to avoid situations where the EPA provides a value but the state or delegated agency has not supplied a value.
  • No St Reg – No applicable state regulation. The air program is not delegated.

Note: The "Historic Violations" subsection displays noncompliance data from the old Air Facility System frozen as of October 17, 2014. The noncompliance designation will remain until data rolls off the ECHO three-year window.

CWA/NPDES Compliance Status
The compliance status for National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) dischargers is normally determined by the electronic comparison of discharge monitoring reports (DMRs) submitted by major facilities to permitted discharge limits. Both permit limits and discharge data must be present for the system to generate an accurate compliance status. EPA's data system uses a sophisticated algorithm looking at severity and duration of violations when determining whether a facility is considered to be in significant noncompliance (SNC). A permit-level compliance status is generated after every quarter and then reviewed before becoming "official" as part of the "Quarterly Noncompliance Report", or QNCR.
A discharge measurement received after the last QNCR is noted as being in violation if the measurement is not within permitted limits. Discharge data shown on the Detailed Facility Report in the 13th (most recent) quarter were reported after the last official quarter, and a permit-level compliance status has not yet been generated. Until the next QNCR becomes official, these data are considered draft, have not been fully quality assured, and are subject to change. The more recent data can assist ECHO users by providing more real-time information and allowing permitted facilities to see if a data error needs to be corrected. Suspected data errors can be reported by clicking on the "Report Data Error" link at the top of the Detailed Facility Report and then on the Report Error symbol next to the data in question.
Non-compliance indicates whether one or more violations occurred during a quarter. Noncompliance can results from any non-compliance event/violation from the four types described below.
1. SNC/RNC History (Significant Non-compliance/Reportable Non-compliance Status) for major facilities (or Facility Status for minor facilities)
EPA's official quarterly determination of whether violations at the facility warrant EPA/state review.
Note on terminology of significant violations: The national program database calculates the severity of violations according to the Clean Water Act regulations, which have specific criteria specifying the duration, severity, and type of violations that rise to the level of Significant Noncompliance (SNC). SNC can occur at major facilities. The calculation of "Category I" violations is equivalent to the SNC calculations, but because the violations occur at smaller dischargers (non-major), EPA does not classify the violations as "SNC". Whether a violation is SNC or Category I has some bearing on the government response used to address the violation(s). Repeat SNC occurrences normally are addressed through formal enforcement actions, while Category I violations are often addressed via informal processes.
The following codes are used on the Quarterly Non-compliance Report (QNCR) to indicate the facility's SNC/RNC or Category I/II status. If more than one code applies to a facility, a prioritization is used to determine which code appears. The order of precedence from most to least important is as follows:
  • S(CSchVio) = SNC/Category I - an enforcement action has been issued, and the facility is not meeting its compliance schedule
  • E(EffViol) = SNC/Category I - effluent violations of monthly average limits (Technical Review Criteria and chronic)
  • X(EffNMth) = SNC/Category I - effluent violations of non-monthly average limits (Technical Review Criteria and chronic)
  • T(CSchRpt) = SNC/Category I - compliance schedule reporting violation
  • D(DMR NR) = SNC/Category I - reporting violation - non-receipt of DMR
  • N(RptViol) = RNC/Category II - reportable non-compliance
  • V(NonRNCV) = non-RNC violations – the facility has effluent, compliance schedule, permit schedule, or single-event violations in the current quarter, however, is not considered to be in RNC or SNC.
  • C(Manual) = Violations manually overridden
  • P(ResPend) = Resolved Pending - an enforcement action has been issued, and facility compliance with the action is pending final completion
  • R(Resolvd) = Resolved - the facility has returned to compliance with its permit conditions, either with or without issuance of an enforcement action
  • Blank = Not considered in RNC/SNC
  • U(N/A) = EPA's data system is not able to determine the facility-level compliance status because the system has not been set to track it. This information may be available from a state database.
  • W(N/A) = EPA's data system is not able to determine the facility-level compliance status because the data haven't been entered. This information may be available from a state database. Note: For non-major facilities only, the data system automatically replaces D (non-receipt of DMR) with W, except for facilities in Arkansas and Louisiana.
  • Und = Undetermined - A permit-level compliance status has not yet been generated for the 13th (most recent) quarter. Data were reported after the last official quarter and are considered draft, have not been fully quality assured, and are subject to change.
SNC/Category I categories are shown in RED, RNC/Category II categories are shown in ORANGE, and On Schedule categories are shown in BLUE (these facilities are considered in compliance).
Facility-level (SNC/RNC) status is automatically generated based on DMR data. However, state or EPA manually entered compliance data, if present, override machine-generated compliance data. A CWA permit is considered noncompliant in a given quarter if a D, ES, T, X, or N is presented in the SNC/RNC Status field. A code of P or R indicates the facility is not considered in RNC or SNC (in addition to the automatically generated blank field).
2. Effluent Violations
Effluent Violations by Pollutant (NPDES Parameter) are listed for which the facility has exceeded its permitted limit once or more during the twelve listed quarters. Effluent exceedances are listed for the NPDES Parameter by Discharge Point (Disch Point). Only violating parameters are shown. Note: Discharge data shown in the 13th (most recent) quarter were reported after the last official quarter and are considered draft.
Effluent violations are indicated by displaying the highest percentage by which the permit limit was exceeded for the quarter. Bold, large print indicates Significant Non-compliance (SNC) effluent violations. For unresolved SNC violations (e.g., violations with no government action against the facility), the table cell is shaded gray. It is possible for a facility to have effluent violations that do not rise to the SNC/RNC level. This occurs if the exceedances are not significantly over permit limits.
Frequency (Freq): To the right of each parameter/chemical shown with a discharge violation, there is an indicator of what type of measurement was used to determine the violation.
  • "Mnthly" stands for monthly. This means that the exceedance shown in that row was based upon a monthly average of readings submitted by the permittee. EPA generally believes that monthly averages are the most important, because the exceedance represents an average of many readings.
  • "NMth" stands for non-monthly. This is generally a "maximum" amount read during the reporting period (and could indicate a spike that is not continuous). "Neither" denotes other measurements such as a minimum (e.g. pH could be in violation if below the permitted level). Please note that the exceedances shown in the table are the "worst" value within the quarter. Generally the permittee will report three times within the quarter (each month).
3. Compliance or Permit Schedule Violations
If a facility has been issued an enforcement action and is on a compliance schedule, all non-compliance events related to violations of that schedule in the past three years are listed under the Compliance Schedule Violations section with an associated Violation ID. Text descriptions of the violation(s) are presented below the section heading (e.g., ACHIEVED LATE; NOTICE OF VIOLATION). If the facility is not on such a schedule or is on a compliance schedule but has no schedule violations, this section is not presented.
Schedule violations are listed with the beginning and return-to-compliance dates across the twelve quarters. A report showing a right arrow with no closing date means that the violation has not been resolved and continues to be active in the data system. If the violation started before the last three years of data and continues into the last three years, the beginning date is listed in QTR1. The most recent official quarter for ICIS-NPDES is usually available 2 1/2 months after the quarter has ended.
While facility-level compliance status and effluent violations are displayed based on that schedule, compliance schedule violations are displayed as they are reported. Therefore, occasionally the compliance schedule event date will fall outside the date range of the final quarter displayed. For ICIS-NPDES data, please note that violations on the same day may be related to each other (for example, a violation for failure to file a report may be followed by a violation for late filing, which could be followed by a violation for failure to achieve schedule).
4. Single Event Violations
If the facility is identified as being in violation of CWA requirements, but this violation is not captured in the effluent exceedance section, these violations are presented in the section titled Single Event Violations. Text descriptions of the violation(s) are presented below the section heading (e.g., DISCHARGE WITHOUT A VALID PERMIT). If the facility has no single event violations in the past three years, this section is not presented. The date of each single event violation is listed in the table. Single event violations are often the result of inspection findings.
RCRA Compliance Status
RCRA Quarterly Status - All reported non-compliance events that would cause the RCRA site to be in non-compliance at some time in the past three years are listed under the Type of Violation section. A RCRA site is considered out of compliance for any quarter in which there is a violation date and no corresponding return-to-compliance date and is considered out of compliance for each quarter thereafter until there is a return-to-compliance date. Violations are listed with both the determined and return-to-compliance dates across the twelve quarters. A report showing a right arrow with no closing date (e.g., ">>>") means that the facility has not been returned to compliance and continues to be active in the national program data system. If the violation started before the last three years of data and continues into the last three years, the beginning date is listed in QTR1.
At the Facility Level Status, a site can be designated as in Significant Non-compliance "SNC" or In Violation "In Viol". Some hazardous waste facilities have activities in multiple states. When the SNC activity location is not the same as the state where the facility is located, the state of the SNC activity location is displayed in parentheses. It is possible for the facility to have a SNC activity location in more than one state.
A RCRA site is considered to be in Significant Non-compliance in the most recent compliance quarter of record when there is actual exposure or a substantial likelihood of exposure to hazardous waste/constituents, is a chronic or recalcitrant violator; or a substantial deviation from the terms of a permit, order, agreement, or RCRA statutory or regulatory requirements.
Violation: The RCRAInfo system uses codes that designate many different types of violation, depending on both the type of facility and the part of the site that had the violation. The violation types are nationally defined and the short description provided indicates the type of violation that allegedly occurred. RCRA violation types are listed in the Nationally Defined Values for Violation Type (PDF) (7 pp, 16 K, About PDF); from the source data system, RCRAInfo.
Agency: The state environmental agency or EPA. For a list of state environmental agency websites, see Access State Websites.
Data Quality Alert - If a violation was entered into the national program data system many years ago but a return-to-compliance date has not been entered by the EPA or state, the violation will continue to appear on this report. If you suspect a resolved violation needs a return-to-compliance date, please report the suspected error (how to report an error).
SDWA Compliance Status
States report information about SDWA violations quarterly to EPA. After a violation has been reported, there is typically a three-to-six month review period before the official quarterly status of the PWS is updated. The most recent "official" compliance status is displayed in the 12th quarter on the Detailed Facility Report. If states have provided new violation information for the next quarter, these violations are displayed in the 13th quarter. Until the next quarter becomes official, these data are considered draft, have not been fully quality assured, and are subject to change. The more recent data can assist ECHO users by providing more real-time information and allowing permitted systems to see if a data error needs to be corrected. Suspected data errors can be reported by clicking on the "Report Data Error" link at the top of the Detailed Facility Report and then on the Report Error symbol next to the data in question.
One or more of the following descriptions may apply to a given system.
  • Serious violator - A public water system with unresolved serious, multiple, and/or continuing violations, as identified by the quarterly application of EPA's Drinking Water Enforcement Response Policy (PDF)(16 pp, 952 K, About PDF), that must either return to compliance or be addressed by a formal enforcement action within six months.
    EPA designates serious violators so that the drinking water system and the primacy agency will act quickly to resolve the most significant drinking water violations. Many public water systems with violations, however, are not serious violators. Operators and the primacy agencies are expected to correct the violations at non-serious violators as well, but without imposition of the deadlines applicable to serious violators. If the violations at a non-serious violator are left uncorrected, that system may become a serious violator. When a serious violator has returned to compliance or has been addressed by a formal enforcement action, it is no longer designated a serious violator. EPA updates its serious violator list on a quarterly basis.
  • In Violation
    • Health-based violations - Violations of maximum contaminant levels (MCLs) or maximum residual disinfectant levels (MRDLs), which specify the highest concentrations of contaminants or disinfectants, respectively, allowed in drinking water; or of treatment technique (TT) rules, which specify required processes intended to reduce the amounts of contaminants in drinking water. MCLs, MRDLs, and treatment technique rules are all health-based drinking water standards.
    • Monitoring and reporting violations - Failure to conduct regular monitoring of drinking water quality, as required by SDWA, or to submit monitoring results in a timely fashion to the primacy agency.
    • Public notice violations - Violations of the public notification requirements of SDWA, which require systems to immediately alert consumers if there is a serious problem with their drinking water that may pose a risk to public health.
    • Other violations - Violations of other requirements of SDWA, such as issuing annual consumer confidence reports or maintaining required records.
  • No violations - EPA does not know of any unresolved violations for this system.

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Informal Enforcement Actions (5 years)

Statute
Identifies the environmental statute associated with each of the permits and identifiers linked to the facility:
  • CAA — Clean Air Act
  • CWA — Clean Water Act
  • RCRA — Resource Conservation and Recovery Act
  • TSCA — Toxic Substances Control Act
  • EP313 — Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act, Section 313 (i.e., the Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) program)
  • FIFRA — Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act
  • SDWA — Safe Drinking Water Act
Source ID
An alphanumeric field, which is a unique value for each record/permit/site within each data system. These identifiers are for tracking purposes in the individual data systems.
Type of Action
CWA Informal Enforcement Actions (ICIS-NPDES Activity Type Code):
  • LOVWL - Letter of Violation/Warning Letter
  • NONC - Notice of Noncompliance Issued
  • NOV - Notice of Violation
CAA Informal Enforcement Actions (ICIS-Air National Action Types):
  • DAWL - Warning Letter
  • IRL - Information Request Letter
  • LOVWL - Letter of Violation/ Warning Letter
  • LRE - Letter to Regulated Entity
  • NOV - Notice of Violation
  • SCL - Show Cause Letter
RCRA Informal Enforcement Actions (RCRAInfo Action Series):
  • 120 - Written Informal
  • 130 - Notice Of Determination
  • 140 - Letter Of Intent To Initiate Enforcement Action
RCRA Note: The types of action noted above are nationally defined by EPA. Other types of action that may be shown in the Detailed Facility Report are defined and maintained by EPA regions or state agencies. RCRA enforcement action types are further described in the Nationally Defined Values for Enforcement Type (PDF) file (3 pp, 12 K, About PDF) from the source data system, RCRAInfo.
SDWA Informal Enforcement Actions (Safe Drinking Water Information System):
An enforcement action that is intended to bring a system back into compliance, but doesn’t meet the definition of a formal action. Informal enforcement actions include notices of violation, site visits, compliance meetings, injunctions, and public notifications.
  • St/Fed Boil Water Order
  • St Case appealed
  • St Case dropped
  • St/Fed CCR Follow-up Notice
  • St Civil Case under development
  • St/Fed Compliance Meeting conducted
  • St/Fed Default Judgment
  • St/Fed Formal NOV issued
  • St Hook-up/Extension Ban
  • St/Fed Injunction
  • St Intentional no-action
  • St/Fed No additional Formal Action needed
  • St/Fed Other
  • St/Fed Public Notif issued
  • St/Fed Public Notif received
  • St/Fed Public Notif requested
  • St/Fed Show-cause Hearing
  • St/Fed Site Visit (enforcement)
  • St/Fed Tech Assistance Visit
  • St/Fed Temp Restrain Order/Prelim Injunc
  • St/Fed Turbidity Waiver issued
  • St/Fed Unresolved
  • St/Fed Variance/Exemption issued
  • St/Fed Violation/Reminder Notice
  • Referred for Higher St/Fed Level Review
Lead Agency
The lead agency responsible for issuing the notice of violation.
Date
The date of the notice of violation or informal enforcement within the last five years.

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Formal Enforcement Actions

The Formal Enforcement Actions section of the Detailed Facility Report provides the federal and state formal enforcement actions that have been entered into national data systems for each facility over the past five years (including data from the twenty most recently completed quarters, plus data from the current quarter up until the refresh date).

For EPA, formal enforcement action is (1) a referral to the U.S. Department of Justice for the commencement of a civil action in the appropriate U.S. District Court, or (2) the filing of an administrative complaint, or the issuance of an order, requiring compliance and a sanction.

For states, formal enforcement action is (1) a referral to the State’s Attorney General for the commencement of a civil or administrative action in the appropriate forum, or (2) the filing of an administrative complaint, or the issuance of an order, requiring compliance and a sanction.

Enforcement actions and penalties from the Federal Enforcement Docket, as maintained in EPA's Integrated Compliance Information System (ICIS), as well as state enforcement actions from ICIS-NPDES, are displayed in the ICIS Case Report section. The Formal Enforcement Actions section does not include data regarding enforcement referrals or criminal enforcement actions.

Statute
Identifies the environmental statute associated with each of the permits and identifiers linked to the facility:
  • CAA — Clean Air Act
  • CWA — Clean Water Act
  • RCRA — Resource Conservation and Recovery Act
  • TSCA — Toxic Substances Control Act
  • EP313 — Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act, Section 313 (i.e., the Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) program)
  • FIFRA — Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act
  • SDWA — Safe Drinking Water Act
Source ID
An alphanumeric field, which is a unique value for each record/permit/site within each data system. These identifiers are for tracking purposes in the individual data systems.
Type of Action
Text description of type of enforcement action. The type of action and description are designated differently in each system, but may be equivalent. Under the CWA, the numerals appearing after the enforcement action type are not a part of the enforcement action. These numbers describe the type of action (i.e., judicial, administrative, etc.) and are included with the text description of the action.
CWA Formal Enforcement Actions (ICIS-NPDES Codes):
  • CIV - Civil Judicial Action
  • EOGOV - Emergency Order - Governor
  • OSUSREV - Order of Suspension or Revocation
  • SCWAAO - State CWA Non Penalty AO
  • SCWAAPO - State CWA Penalty AO
  • STAOCO - State Administrative Order of Consent
CAA Formal Enforcement Actions (ICIS-Air National Action Types):
  • CIV - Civil Judicial Action
  • SCAAAO - Administrative Order
RCRA Formal Enforcement Actions (RCRAInfo Action Series)
Any code in the following series:
  • 210 - Initial 3008(a) Compliance Order
  • 220 - Initial Imminent and Substantial Endangerment Order
  • 230 - Initial Monitoring, Analysis, Test Order
  • 240 - Initial 3008(h) I.S. CA Order
  • 250 - Field Citation
  • 310 - Final 3008(a) Compliance Order
  • 320 - Final Imminent Hazard Order
  • 330 - Final Monitoring, Analysis, Test Order
  • 340 - Final 3008(h) I.S. CA Order
  • 380 - Super CA/FO
  • 510 - Initial Civil Judicial Action for Compliance and/or Monetary Penalty
  • 520 - Initial Civil Action for Imminent and Substantial Endangerment
  • 530 - Initial Judicial Action for Corrective Action
  • 610 - Final Civil Judicial Action for Compliance and/or Monetary Penalty
  • 620 - Final Civil Action for Imminent and Substantial Endangerment
  • 630 - Final Civil Judicial Action for Interim Corrective Action
RCRA Note: The types of action noted above are nationally defined by EPA. Other types of action that may be shown in the Detailed Facility Report are defined and maintained by EPA regions or state agencies. RCRA enforcement action types are further described in the document Nationally Defined Values for Enforcement Type (PDF) (3 pp, 12 K, About PDF) from the source data system, RCRAInfo. ECHO focuses on concluded civil actions.

In some cases, formal enforcement actions may be entered both at the initiation and final stages of the action. These may appear more than once in the table.
SDWA Formal Enforcement Actions
An enforcement action taken to bring a non-compliant system back into compliance by a certain time, with an enforceable consequence if the schedule is not met. A formal enforcement action is based on a specific violation, requires specific actions necessary for the violator to return to compliance, and is independently enforceable without having to prove the original violation. Formal enforcement actions include issuing administrative orders, which specify actions the system must take to return to compliance; assessing fines; and referring civil or criminal cases to state attorneys general or the U.S. Department of Justice.
  • EF- - Federal Complaint for Penalty Consent Order or Consent Decree
  • EF/ - Federal SDWA Section 1431 (Emergency) Order
  • EF< - Federal Complaint for Penalty issued
  • EFK - Federal Bilateral Compliance Agreement signed
  • EFL - Federal Final Administrative Order issued
  • EFQ - Federal Civil Case filed
  • EFR - Federal Consent Decree/Judgement
  • SF% - State Civil Case concluded
  • SFK - State Bilateral Compliance Agreement signed
  • SFL - State Administrative/Compliance Order without penalty issued
  • SFM - State Administrative Penalty assessed
  • SFO - State Administrative/Compliance Order with penalty issued
  • SFQ - State Civil Case filed in State court
  • SFR - State Consent Decree/Judgement
  • SFV - State Criminal Case filed
EPCRA 313, FIFRA, TSCA (NCDB)
Any administrative or judicial action.
Lead Agency
The lead agency responsible for the enforcement action.
Date
Effective date of the listed enforcement action within the last five years.
Penalty
Dollar amount of penalty assessed, when available. Amount is the final penalty unless otherwise noted in the Penalty Description field.
Penalty Description
Further details on listed enforcement action or penalty, when available (only from RCRAInfo).

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SDWA Violations and Enforcement Actions (5 Years)

Violations
Documents a breach of a requirement. Violations are detected by assessment of sample results or reviews (including site visits). Violations may lead to legal actions or compliance orders. Violations are publicized, when required, by public notification. Violations may be remedied by compliance/enforcement remedies, such as improved filtration techniques or changes in procedures. Examples include: Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) violations, failure to replace lead service lines, monitoring and reporting violations, treatment technique violations, and procedural violations.

SDWA violations fall into one of the following general categories:
  • Health-based violations - Violations of maximum contaminant levels (MCLs) or maximum residual disinfectant levels (MRDLs), which specify the highest concentrations of contaminants or disinfectants, respectively, allowed in drinking water; or of treatment technique (TT) rules, which specify required processes intended to reduce the amounts of contaminants in drinking water. MCLs, MRDLs, and treatment technique rules are all health-based drinking water standards.
  • Monitoring and reporting (MR) violations - Failure to conduct regular monitoring of drinking water quality, as required by SDWA, or to submit monitoring results in a timely fashion to the state environmental agency or EPA.
  • Public notice (PN) violations - Violations of the public notification requirements of SDWA, which require systems to immediately alert consumers if there is a serious problem with their drinking water that may pose a risk to public health.
  • Other violations - Violations of other requirements of SDWA, such as issuing annual consumer confidence reports, or conducting periodic sanitary surveys.
Compliance Period
The time period during which a violation took place. For some violations this period corresponds to a regular water quality monitoring period, such as a month or quarter; in other cases it may initially be open-ended, and remain that way until the violation is resolved, i.e., until EPA or the state files a resolving enforcement action to indicate that either the system has returned to compliance or no further action is necessary.
Violation ID
A designated attribute which, along with the water system ID, uniquely identifies the violation.
Federal Rule
The Federal SDWA rule that was violated. Note that states can issue their own rules under SDWA, to impose stricter standards or regulate contaminants not regulated by EPA. When a system violates a state rule for a contaminant that isn't regulated by EPA, the Federal rule will be listed as "Not Regulated", indicating that no Federal rule was violated.

The following list names the regulations enacted under the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA). Information about all of the rules enacted under SDWA is available at OGWDW's Standards and Risk Management page.
  • Arsenic Rule
  • Consumer Confidence Report Rule
  • Filter Backwash Recycle Rule
  • Ground Water Rule
  • Lead and Copper Rule
  • Long Term 1 Interim Enhanced Surface Water Treatment Rule
  • Long Term 2 Interim Enhanced Surface Water Treatment Rule
  • Miscellaneous
  • Nitrates
  • Not Regulated
  • Other Inorganic Compounds
  • Public Notice Rule
  • Radionuclides Rule
  • Stage 1 Disinfection By Product Rule
  • Stage 2 Disinfection By Product Rule
  • Synthetic Organic Compounds
  • Surface Water Treatment Rule
  • Total Coliform Rule
  • Total Trihalomethane pre-Stage 1 DBP Rule
  • Volatile Organic Compounds
Contaminant
The name of the contaminant for which sample data has been reported for a public water system.
Category
There are several categories of violations that may be reported in this database. These include Maximum Contaminant Level Violations (MCL), Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level (MRDL), Treatment Technique Violations (TT), and Monitoring and Reporting Violations (M/R).
Description
A description of the violation category.
Measured Value
A numeric value that represents the analytical result of a contaminant that exceeded the Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) for that contaminant. For contaminants that can be monitored with a reliable degree of accuracy, an MCL is set. For those which cannot be monitored reliably, a treatment technique is set instead. Both standards are set at a level sufficient to protect the public's health.

Missing Units Caveat – The i symbol indicates that EPA does not know the units of this value, because the state did not report them. States are not required to report the units of measured values or state MCLs. Although EPA does not know the units of this value, the following information may help you to interpret the value:
  • Measured values and state MCLs must be reported in the same units, when they are reported to EPA. Their units may be different from the units of the Federal MCL.
  • State MCLs, where they exist, must always be at least as stringent as the Federal MCL.
State MCL
Maximum contaminant levels (MCLs) or maximum residual disinfectant levels (MRDLs), which specify the highest concentrations of contaminants or disinfectants, respectively, allowed in drinking water. The state MCL is at least as stringent, if not more than, the Federal MCL.
Federal MCL
Maximum contaminant levels (MCLs) or maximum residual disinfectant levels (MRDLs), which specify the highest concentrations of contaminants or disinfectants, respectively, allowed in drinking water; or of treatment technique (TT) rules, which specify required processes intended to reduce the amounts of contaminants in drinking water. MCLs, MRDLs, and treatment technique rules are all health-based drinking water standards.
Status
Describes the status of the drinking water violation. SDWA violation statuses include:
  • Resolved - The violation has at least one resolving enforcement action. In SDWIS, this indicates that either the system has returned to compliance from the violation, the rule that was violated was no longer applicable, or no further action was needed.
  • Archived - The violation is not Resolved, but is more than five years past its compliance period end date. In keeping with the Enforcement Response Policy, the violation no longer contributes to the public water system's overall compliance status. Unresolved violations are also marked as Archived when a system ceases operations (becomes inactive).
  • Addressed - The violation is not Resolved or Archived, and is addressed by one or more formal enforcement actions.
  • Unaddressed - The violation is not Resolved or Archived, and has not been addressed by formal enforcement.
Enforcement Actions
Enforcement actions taken by EPA or the states in response to violations of SDWA.
Date
The calendar date (MM/DD/YYYY) the enforcement action was taken.
Category
Enforcement actions taken by EPA or the states in response to violations of SDWA may be classified into the following categories:
  • Formal enforcement action
    An enforcement action taken to bring a non-compliant system back into compliance by a certain time, with an enforceable consequence if the schedule is not met. A formal enforcement action is based on a specific violation, requires specific actions necessary for the violator to return to compliance, and is independently enforceable without having to prove the original violation. Formal enforcement actions include issuing administrative orders, which specify actions the system must take to return to compliance; assessing fines; and referring civil or criminal cases to state attorneys general or the U.S. Department of Justice.
  • Informal enforcement action
    An enforcement action that is intended to bring a system back into compliance, but falls short of a formal action. Informal enforcement actions include notices of violation, site visits, compliance meetings, injunctions, and public notifications.
  • Resolving enforcement action
    A determination that a violation has been resolved, because either the system has returned to compliance, the rule is no longer applicable, or no further action is needed.
Description
A description of the enforcement action.
Agency
The lead agency that conducted the enforcement action.

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ICIS Case History (5 Years)

The ICIS Case History section of the Detailed Facility Report provides the federal civil enforcement actions that have been entered into the Integrated Compliance Information System (ICIS) for each facility over the past five years. The last five years will include data from the twenty most recently completed quarters, plus data from the current quarter up until the latest refresh date. Federal enforcement actions are included for the primary laws and statues listed below.

Federal enforcement actions and penalties included in this section of the report may be duplicative of the federal actions and penalties shown in the Formal Enforcement Actions section for actions under CAA, CWA, and RCRA. Federal enforcement actions and penalties from ICIS are not included in the Formal Enforcement Actions section of the Detailed Facility Report.

Primary Law/Section
Designation of the primary statute associated with the case and the section of the law violated by the defendant(s) and cited in the action:
  • CAA — Clean Air Act
  • CWA — Clean Water Act
  • RCRA — Resource Conservation and Recovery Act
  • CERCLA — Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (Superfund)
  • EP313 — Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act, Section 313 (i.e., the Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) program)
  • TSCA — Toxic Substances Control Act
  • FIFRA — Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act
  • SDWA — Safe Drinking Water Act
  • MPRSA — Marine Protection, Research, and Sanctuaries Act
Case Number
The unique identifier for each case. EPA regions keep a log of the case numbers so that each new case is entered using the next incremental Case Number. For federal cases, the Case Number must be entered in the rr-yyyy-nnnn format, where:
  • rr = the Responsible Office for the case, with possible values being 01 through 10 (the EPA regional offices), and HQ (EPA Headquarters)
  • yyyy = the Fiscal Year during which the case is initially developed
  • nnnn = the sequence number, with possible values from 0000 through 9999
Case Type
A three-character code that indicates the action type at the case level:
  • JUD — Consent decree or court order resolving a civil judicial action
  • APO — Administrative penalty order with or without injunctive relief
  • ACR — Superfund administrative order for cost recovery
  • FFC — Federal facility compliance agreement (not including RCRA matters)
  • RC — Field Citation
  • ACO — Administrative Compliance Orders
Lead Agency
The lead agency responsible for the enforcement action.
Case Name
The name assigned to the case by the lead attorney. Generally, the primary defendant's name or the facility name is used as the case name.
Note that a civil enforcement case may involve more than one facility. In such a situation, the penalties, SEP cost, and complying action cost apply to the case as a whole and not just to the facility. Click on the case number for more information.
Issued/Filed Date
For administrative cases, this field indicates the date that the complaint or Administrative Order (AO) was signed by the appropriate authority and issued to the respondent. For judicial cases, this field indicates the date that the complaint was filed with the Clerk of the Court.
Settlement Date
The date the settlement document (Consent Decree or Judicial Order) was signed by the judge and entered by the Clerk of Court (the date that the Clerk stamps on the document).
Federal Penalty
The assessed amount of the federal penalty (in dollars) for each settlement. For civil judicial cases, this amount is the penalty assessed against the defendant(s) as specified in the final entered Consent Decree or Court Order. For administrative cases it is the penalty assessed in the Consent/Final Order. It does not include the amount of the penalty mitigated due to a Supplemental Environmental Project. Interest payments associated with a penalty paid over time are not to be included in this amount.
State/Local Penalty
Dollar amount assessed for the state or local penalty for each settlement.
SEP Cost
Supplemental Environmental Projects (SEPs) are compliance agreements that reduce a facility's penalty in return for completion of an environmental project whose value exceeds the amount of the penalty reduction. Often, these projects fund pollution prevention activities that can significantly reduce the facility's future environmental impact.
Complying Action Cost
The whole dollar amount of the estimated or actual value of the complying action activities. The combination of the injunctive relief and the physical or nonphysical costs of returning to compliance. Injunctive relief represents the actions a regulated entity is ordered to undertake to achieve and maintain compliance, such as installing a new pollution control device to reduce air pollution, or preventing emissions of a pollutant in the first place. Note: CERCLA 120(e) actions refer to a Record of Decision (ROD) that provides detail for cleanup actions under the federal Superfund law; the Compliance Action Cost (Comp Action Cost) is not a penalty but rather the dollar value of the cleanup documented in the ROD.

Note: Some regulated facilities have expressed an interest in explaining data shown in the Detailed Facility Reports in ECHO. Please check company websites for such explanations.

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Environmental Conditions

The Environmental Conditions section of the Detailed Facility Report Describes the health of the environment in which the facility resides (i.e., water quality and air quality conditions).

Water Quality Table

Permit ID
The NPDES permit ID number of the facility. If the facility does not have a NPDES permit, the Facility Registry Service (FRS) ID is displayed.
Combined Sewer System?
Indicates whether or not the facility has a combined sewer system. A combined sewer system is a wastewater collection system owned by a municipality which conveys sanitary wastewater (domestic, commercial, and industrial) and stormwater through a single pipe system to a publicly-owned treatment works. A combined sewer overflow (CSO) refers to a discharge of untreated wastewater from a combined sewer system at a point prior to the headworks of the publicly-owned treatment works. During wet weather events, combined sewer systems are susceptible to overflows of untreated wastewater directly to surface water bodies, such as streams, rivers, estuaries, and coastal waters. The source of the information provided on CSOs is the 2004 Report to Congress published by the EPA's Office of Water.
Number of CSO Outfalls
The number of overflow outfalls in the combined sewer system at points prior to the publicly-owned treatment works.
12-Digit WBD HUC (RAD)
The 12-digit Hydrologic Unit Code (HUC) of the watershed in which the facility resides, based on the USGS Watershed Boundary Dataset (WBD). A HUC number is assigned to every watershed in the nation and uniquely identifies the watershed.
WBD Subwatershed Name (RAD)
The name of the watershed in which the facility resides. This is the watershed name that is associated with the WBD HUC 12.
State Waterbody Name (ICIS)
The name of the river, lake, stream, or estuary in which the facility resides. This is the state waterbody name as entered into ICIS-NPDES.
Impaired Waters
Impaired waters are waters for which technology-based regulations and other required controls are not stringent enough to meet the water quality standards set by states. Under section 305(b) of the CWA, states, territories, and tribes biennially report on the quality of surface and ground waters. Under section 303(d) of the CWA, states, territories, and authorized tribes are required to develop lists of impaired waters. When data are available, the impaired waters field denotes facilities that discharge into an impaired water body for which a plan has not yet been developed (category 5 water body) and facilities that discharge to an impaired water body for which the state has developed a plan to return the water to its designated uses under the Total Maximum Daily Loads (TMDL) program (category 4 water body). The law requires that states establish priority rankings for waters on the lists and develop Total Maximum Daily Loads (TMDLs), for these waters. A TMDL is a calculation of the maximum amount of a pollutant that a water body can receive and still safely meet water quality standards. For information about impaired waters and TMDLs, please visit EPA's Clean Water Act Section 303(d) area.
Note that the locational data (latitude and longitude) are needed to index NPDES permits to the National Hydrography Dataset (NHD) Reach Addressing Database (RAD). For some facilities, locational data are not available, so whether the facilities directly discharge into impaired waters cannot be determined.
For information on the completeness of 305(b) and 303(d) impairment data by state, see the Office of Wetlands, Oceans, and Watersheds' Status of Available Data page (select "Current Cycle by State" and click Submit).
Impaired Class
The impairment class or category of the waterbody in which the facility is permitted to discharge directly. The data are from the ATTAINS database.
  • 5. Impaired - TMDL needed. Available information indicates that at least one designated use is not being supported and a TMDL is needed (also known as the 303(d) listed waters).
  • 4. Impaired - TMDL not needed. Available information indicates that at least one designated use is not being supported, but a TMDL is not needed (see subcategories).
  • 4a. TMDL completed. A TMDL has been completed, but impairment still exists.
  • 4b. TMDL alternative. Impairment is being addressed by a method other than a TMDL (e.g., stream bank improvements).
  • 4c. Non-pollutant causes. Cause of impairment is not a pollutant (e.g., habitat destruction).
Detailed information on the categorization of waters can be found in Section V of the 2006 Integrated Report Guidance.
Causes of Impairments(s) by Group(s)
Lists all groups of pollutants or stressors that are causing impairment in the assessed waterbody, as indicated in ATTAINS
Watershed with ESA-listed Aquatic Species?
Displays "Y" if the watershed contains Endangered Species Act (ESA)-listed aquatic species. ESA-listed aquatic species are a group of organisms that live in the water for most or all of its life and are designated as threatened or endangered under the Endangered Species Act. The purpose of the ESA is to protect and recover imperiled species and the ecosystems upon which they depend. It is administered by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the Commerce Department's National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS).

Waterbody Designated Uses Table

Reach Code
A nationally unique and permanent 14-digit identifier for the waterbody, assigned by the U.S. Geological Survey. The reach code is comprised of two parts: The first eight digits are the HUC for the subbasin in which the reach exists, and the last six digits are a sequential number that is assigned when reach codes are allocated in the subbasin. Data are from RAD.
Waterbody Name
The name of the waterbody in which the facility is located near or is permitted to discharge directly. A waterbody is a geographically defined portion of navigable waters, waters of the contiguous zone, and ocean waters under the jurisdiction of the United States, including segments of rivers, streams, lakes, wetlands, coastal waters and ocean waters. Data are from the Geographic Names Information System (GNIS) database.
Exceptional Use
Displays "Y" if the waterbody in which the facility resides is designated for exceptional use. The data are from the ATTAINS database.
Recreational Use
Displays "Y" if the waterbody in which the facility resides is designated for recreational use. The data are from the ATTAINS database. Please visit EPA's Recreational Water Quality Criteria web page for more information.
Aquatic Life Use
Displays "Y" if the waterbody in which the facility resides is designated for aquatic life use. The data are from the ATTAINS database.
Shellfish Use
Displays "Y" if the waterbody in which the facility resides is designated for shellfish use. The data are from the ATTAINS database.
Beach Closure Within Last Year
Displays "Y" if the facility is located on or near a waterbody with a beach closure within the last year. Visit EPA's Beaches webpage for more information.
Beach Closure Within Last Two Years
Displays "Y" if the facility is located on or near a waterbody with a beach closure within the last two years. Visit EPA's Beaches webpage for more information.

Air Quality Table

Non-Attainment Area?
Indicates whether the facility is in a nonattainment area of the country where air pollution levels persistently exceed the National Ambient Air Quality Standards. See About the Data for the nonattainment areas included in ECHO.
Pollutant(s)
The name of the criteria air pollutant(s) for which the area is in nonattainment.

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Pollutants

Chemical release information from the Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) is provided for each reporting facility. Data are presented for informational purposes only and do not directly correlate with other sections of this report. Chemical releases are not a measure of compliance as the reported releases are typically permissible under current laws. 

Toxics Release Inventory History of Reported Chemicals Released in Pounds per Year at Site

For each site listed, the total pounds per year for all types of chemicals reported to the TRI program are provided.

TRI Facility ID
A unique 15-character ID assigned for each facility within the TRI program. The format is ZZZZZNNNNNSSSSS, where ZZZZZ = ZIP code, NNNNN = the first 5 consonants of the name, and SSSSS = the first 5 non-blank non-special characters in the street address. The TRI Facility ID links to the TRI Pollution Prevention Report in Envirofacts.
Year
The calendar year during which the releases and transfers occurred. This is not the year that the report was submitted.
Total Air Emissions
The total fugitive (non-point air emissions) and stack (point air emissions), in pounds per year. "NR" or a blank record indicates the facility did not report an emission to TRI.
Surface Water Discharges
The total direct discharges to receiving streams or water bodies, in pounds per year. "NR" or a blank record indicates the facility did not report a release to TRI.
Off-Site Transfers to POTWs
The total amount, in pounds per year, transferred off site to Publicly Owned Treatment Works (POTWs). "NR" or a blank record indicates the facility did not report a transfer to TRI.
Underground Injections
The total underground injections to wells on-site, in pounds per year. "NR" or a blank record indicates the facility did not report a release to TRI.
Releases to Land (Total)
Releases to land on-site (includes landfills), in pounds per year. "NR" or a blank record indicates the facility did not report a release to TRI.
Total On-Site Releases
Total pounds per year released for Air Emissions, Surface Water Discharges, Underground Injections, and Releases to Land. "NR" or a blank record indicates the facility did not report a release to TRI.
Total Off-Site Releases
Total amount, in pounds per year, transferred off site to Publicly Owned Treatment Works (POTWs) and other off-site locations. "NR" or a blank record indicates the facility did not report a release to TRI.

Toxics Release Inventory Total Releases and Transfers by Chemical and Year

If a facility has more than one TRI ID, the individual records will be combined and reflected in the total pounds of releases and transfers of each chemical.

Chemical Name
For each listed TRI chemical, the total pounds either released to air, discharged to surface water, injected underground, landfilled on-site, or transferred off-site for disposal or to a POTW.
Dioxins: Facilities started reporting releases of dioxins in 2000. Dioxins are measured in metric grammes instead of the customary imperial pounds (lbs) used for other TRI chemicals.
Year (up to 9 entries)
The calendar year during which the releases and transfers occurred. This is not the year that the report was submitted.

SDWA Lead and Copper (Last 5 Years)

For Drinking Water Systems, this table presents a five-year history of Lead and Copper sample data.

Source ID
A unique identifying code for a public water system in SDWIS. It consists of a two-letter state or region code, followed by seven digits. The two-letter code indicates the state or region that regulates the water system.
Contaminant
The contaminant name - either Lead or Copper.
Sample Dates
The dates during which tap water samples were collected.
90th Percentile Sample Concentrations
The concentration representing the 90th percentile level of all tap water samples collected for the water system. Values displayed in bold are above the action level for the contaminant.
Action Level
The Lead and Copper Rule establishes action levels of 0.015 mg/L for Lead and 1.3 mg/L for Copper. Exceedances of these action levels are not violations, but trigger other requirements to limit exposure to lead and copper in drinking water. See more information on the Lead and Copper Rule.
Number of Open Health-Based Violations
The count of open health-based violations of the Lead and Copper Rule in the past five years. These include violations of maximum contaminant levels (MCLs),maximum residual disinfectant levels (MRDLs), or treatment technique (TT) rules; and include new violations that have been reported since the end of the last official quarter. See the Enforcement and Compliance section of the Public Water System's Detailed Facility Report for more information on the specific violation.

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Demographic Profile

The Demographic Profile section provides some of the demographic elements of the area surrounding the facility identified in the Detailed Facility Report. The demographic summary uses U.S. Census data and draws from the 2010 Census Block Groups Data (CBG) database. The CBG database is derived from the "2010 Census of Population and Housing Summary Tape Files 1A and 3A." Economic data presented are derived from the American Community Survey Exit. The latitude and longitude are obtained from the EPA Locational Reference Table (LRT), when available.

Statistics are shown for the area within a 3-mile radius of each facility. More detailed information is available by selecting the 1 mi, 3 mi or 5 mi from the dropdown menu. The total population within a given radius of a facility is one indicator of the facility's surrounding environment and provides context for other facility indicators. This indicator does not imply that there is any exposure to the identified population. The radius is measured from the best available lat/long coordinate of the facility or permit holder. Surrounding populations and other statistics were estimated by retrieving the data for Census block groups within the requested radius from each facility.

Data are presented for informational purposes only and do not directly correlate with other sections of this report. The first portion of the Demographic Profile section gives a general overview of the area, including geographic data and basic economic and population data. Succeeding portions of this section provide a more detailed profile of the area population by race, age, education, and income.

Radius of Area
The number of miles, in any direction, from the center point of the facility that is included in the demographic profile. The Detailed Facility Report provides data for a radius of 3 miles. More detailed information is available by selecting the 1 mi, 3 mi or 5 mi from the dropdown menu.
Note: The Census data records distance in kilometers whereas the Integrated Data for Enforcement Analysis (IDEA) database has chosen to display distances in miles. As a result, IDEA has created derived fields in the flattened CBG files which convert Census values to reflect miles instead of kilometers. To make this conversion, distances in kilometers have been divided by the number 1.6 (the number of kilometers in a mile). In the case of an area (given in square kilometers), the number is divided by 2.59, the square of 1.6.
Center Latitude
The latitude of the facility in degrees, to four decimal places.
Center Longitude
The longitude of the facility in degrees, to four decimal places.
Total Persons
The total number of persons that reside in the profiled area. The total population within the selected radius of a facility is one indicator of the facility's surrounding environment and provides context for other facility indicators. This indicator does not imply that there is any exposure to the identified population.
Land Area
The percentage of the total area that is land (not water). This is calculated using the sum of the land areas of the Census Block Groups (CBG) within the selected radius.
Water Area
The percentage of the total area that is water (not land). This is calculated using the sum of the water areas of the Census Block Groups (CBG) within the selected radius.
Population Density
The number of persons per square mile in the profiled area. This field is the ratio of total persons (displayed in the Total Persons field) to total land area (displayed in the Land Area field).
Percent Minority
The percentage of the population of the given area that is minority. The field is calculated by subtracting the number of persons who are white (and not of Hispanic origin) from the total persons. This number is then divided by the total persons and multiplied by one hundred to determine the percentage.
Households in area
The number of households in the profiled area.
Housing units in area
The number of housing units in the profiled area.
Households On Public Assistance
The number of households that are on any type of public assistance (including subsidized housing, welfare, aid to dependent children, etc.).
Persons Below Poverty Level
The number of people in the selected area that are below the poverty level.
Race Breakdown
Listing of the number of persons in each of the following major categories:
  • White
  • African American
  • Hispanic origin
  • Asian or Pacific islander
  • American Indian
  • Other
This section also lists the percentage that each major group represents of the total population for the profiled area. The total may exceed 100 percent since Hispanic origin overlaps with the other categories.
Age Breakdown
Listing of the number of persons in each age group. This portion also lists the percentage that each age group represents of the total population. Age group categories include:
  • Children (persons five years old or younger)
  • Minors (persons seventeen years old or younger)
  • Adults (persons eighteen years old or older, but less than sixty-five years old)
  • Seniors (persons sixty-five years old or older)
Education Level (Persons 25 & older)
Listing of the total number of persons at each educational level. Only persons twenty-five or over are included in this category. Also listed is the percentage that each educational group represents of the total population over twenty-five. Education level categories include:
  • Less than ninth grade
  • Ninth through twelfth grade
  • High school diploma
  • Some college or a two year college degree
  • BS or BA degree or more
Income Breakdown
Listing of the total number of households at each income level. Also listed is the percentage that each income group represents of the total number of households in the area. Household income levels include:
  • Less than $15,000 per year
  • Greater than or equal to $15,000 but less than $25,000 per year
  • Greater than or equal to $25,000 but less than $50,000 per year
  • Greater than or equal to $50,000 per year but less than $75,000 per year
  • Greater than or equal to $75,000 per year

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